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ziplomacy

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Reply with quote  #1 
There were several other trees like this. I was wondering what was causing this. There are teeth marks evident in the wood, they seem to be running vertically, but it been a few months since I took these and I'm not sure if they were or not. 
I took these February 1st.
Any idea what did this?
IMG_4796.jpeg  IMG_4797.jpeg  IMG_4795.jpg 


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1Longbow

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Reply with quote  #2 
Maybe a porcupine
Tradslinger

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Reply with quote  #3 
nope, beaver. have thinned out a bunch of them over the years. girdle city. hate em. trapped them, shot them with everything. 
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Selden Slider

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Reply with quote  #4 
I watched a dog do the very same thing to a pine tree in the cemetery where I worked.  He went all around the tree.  Weirdest thing I ever saw an animal do.  Frank
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Mgmicky

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Reply with quote  #5 
In the SE, it’s more than likely beavers and I see it a lot in NC/SC.   I’ve seen similar damage from porcupines where we hunt in northern Michigan, but I don’t think they range this far south.
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ziplomacy

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Reply with quote  #6 
I was thinking beaver. As far as I know, we don't have porcupines in TN. But hey, we didn't have gators or cougars a few years ago either and now we do!
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chuckc

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Reply with quote  #7 
How high up do they go Zip ?
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Tradslinger

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Reply with quote  #8 
1st clue is close to water. 2nd is the height of the chew. beavers love bark but also use the trees for their dams. they will girdle every tree around if allowed to. It is what they do. I have had to get rid of beaver for a lot of people over the years. had a guy with a garden up above a river to lose his entire corn crop to them. they cut and dragged every bit of it down to the river. most people get mad at losing so many trees to them as they usually girdle everything. eventually they come back to a tree and chew it down. Beaver have a strong musky smell from their scent glands. Also very good meat to eat for humans or for animals like dogs, cats, big cats, wolves etc. Used to be 2 old men years ago that only ate ground beaver meat, they had plenty of it to eat. Arkansas had a bounty of $10 per tail. One needs to be careful of falling in thru some of their underground dens along river banks, not fun. a porcupine can't do the sheer volume of a beaver or beavers. 
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ziplomacy

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Reply with quote  #9 
It's around 18" maybe a little taller but not much. The ones that are completely girdled are maybe 2'. I didn't see any trees actually chewed into or chewed down in the area, just with the bark gnawed off. If its a beaver it looks like it is new to the area? There were also a few small branches and twigs floating in the water with the bark chewed off. But I've found branches like that wherever I fish, I just figured it was muskrats that did the smaller branches. 
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chuckc

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Reply with quote  #10 
Are there any visible entrys ( slides) going into the water ? Sounds like a mystery....need clues. I think ( not sure) muskrats eat grass and tubers, not gnaw tree bark.
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Reply with quote  #11 
Our horses did this to a bunch of trees once but never did it  again, must have been a vitamin deficiency or something. I remember it being mostly poplar trees,but i've seen deer do it to elm trees in winter down next to the roots.
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Reply with quote  #12 
Yep, looks like beavers to me as well.

Beavers suffer much hate from their fellow dam builders.  While we cut down entire rain forests and submerge valleys under hundreds of feet of water behind giant dams without a thought, we condemn them to near extinction for killing a maple tree and damning a creek.  I know I am guilty of my fair share of beaver animosity in this regard.

Then I read a book which opened my eyes to their role in the ecosystem and how our landscape and ecology has changed (for the worse) with their eradication.  If you are interested, here's a link: https://www.amazon.com/Eager-Surprising-Secret-Beavers-Matter/dp/160358739X


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Reply with quote  #13 
Beaver's, yes.  Steve that is a good book read it and your right, opens your eyes to the conservation, we all need to do.
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Reply with quote  #14 
Believe it or not, I have met Ben, the author of this book - he lives in our city and is an amazing scholar of the beaver... Turns out that many of the river restoration projects and the those trying to bring native trout back into the west are relying on them to build dams and re-build the riparian zones along our streams... I certainly get the distaste for them - they are a pain in the neck if you have property (structures) close to the stream or are trying to get young trees planted on the banks of the river.  People and beavers just want to live in/occupy the same spaces - sort of a natural set-up for trouble between us!   JW  
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Reply with quote  #15 
I totally agree that the beaver is an important animal in nature. All of my dealings have been because of others tired of their destruction to their property. I have been guilty of taking my time in getting rid of several because they were actually doing good for the pond or small lake. They were creating cover for everything in the water to use for surviving and hiding from bigger predators. I had sat and watched them for hours because they are a very effecient animal. But when a landowner is wanting them gone and is willing to even pay someone to do it, then they go. They create a lot of watersheds that are so valuable to so many creatures in nature. Nature and man clash all of the time. Modern man has a way of destroying the very thing that he originally loved about it. Man comes in and says "Oh how beautiful!" and then cuts everything down and then trashes the land. People come into the country like where I live because it is so quiet and nice but then they bring all of their problems with them and try to change everything to remind them of where they just left.  Man has a bad habit of bringing "invasive" creatures from home to a new land, Australia is a country over run with invasive animals that are destroying their native wildlife. And I know that beaver are native animals of this country. Just saying how man has the ability to change everything in nature and usually for the worst.
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Reply with quote  #16 
With all the free time I just re read for the 5th time, "Sand County Almanac".  Aldo Leopold always makes me appreciate my little corner of the land.   Should be on every High School's reading list.  I finished my Leopold Bench this morning.  Now to sit and ponder.  [smile]

Deno

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Reply with quote  #17 
No shortage of beaver here in Colorado.  Brook trout in beaver ponds is one of my favorites. 
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Reply with quote  #18 
Im guilty of loving beavertail wrapped risers. They are fun to watch and trap. There is a time and place. ZIP. Like chuck said look for a drag trail going from the tree to the water. Beavers make a slick trail when they leave the water. If you find a fresher one and a marshal chew made into a tree. Set a game camera just off the trail in some under brush. You will be in for treat. They are fun to watch work.
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Bigmagic

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Reply with quote  #19 
Zip, keep and eye on those trees. It looks like beaver to me too. If they start start getting narrower and narrower, you'll know for sure.

Also, can you take a few pictures of the teeth marks?

ziplomacy

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Reply with quote  #20 
I will try to find them whenever the parks open back up here. It's on a mountain bike/hiking park the town over from me.
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Steve Graf

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Reply with quote  #21 
The beaver in the picture graced our big creek with his dam more than 10 years ago.  When he was done dam building, he perfected his skills at making beaver stew.  He really threw himself into his work [rolleyes] [biggrin]

Beaver1.jpg 

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