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Traditional Archers | Bowhunters
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Soap Creek

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Reply with quote  #1 
I started bwhunting in 81. From then till now I've only used traditional equipment. I never really felt handicapped by equipment.  Low light didn't effect me, my game could be moving (slowly) ,  didn't take long to execute the shot, noise level was low, etc. ... I can see some advantages with a compound.  Like holding at full draw, or taking a bit longer shot. Although most compound guys tell me they usually have there deer within 20 yards.  Also. I have less chance of equipment failure.  Baring a broken bow, the fix is a simple one. So what say ye?  I'd be interested to hear from those who have hunted with both.
ShutterbugBowhunter

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Reply with quote  #2 
I have had equal to more success with a traditional bow.  I believe I know my weapon better and am more in tune to what is around me as well.  I am focused on the experience and the moment, rather than the technology.  I practice nearly every day, not just two to four weeks before the season.
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Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


James Donahue

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Reply with quote  #3 
Can't really say, have never hunted with a compound

To me they feel awful to hold and draw

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Shootalot

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yes, I think a compound is a big advantage for the average hunter but for the traditional hunter that's really on his game, not so much.
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Gordon Jabben
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Sparkitoff

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Reply with quote  #5 
For me, when range exceeds 20-yards I would have an advantage with a compound bow with sights. I know exactly where to "hold" for 15 and 20-yard shots with my traditional bows. Once a target gets to around 22-yards, my ability to judge where to hold and my accuracy suffer enough that I would not take a shot at an animal. If I had a compound, sights would be set for 30, 40, maybe 50 yards. If I knew the range I would have the advantage of knowing I could line up the pin in the peep and make the shot. Overall, its not just the compound bow that would be the advantage, it would actually be the sights. I suppose if there were sight pins on my longbow that were set for various distances that would eliminate any advantage of a compound bow.
Orion

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Reply with quote  #6 
A lot of the TV boys are killing critters at 60 and 80 yards or more nowadays with their compounds. There's no doubt that the high weight let off and sights makes the compound easier and more accurate to shoot, particularly at longer ranges.  If that weren't the case, there wouldn't be so many folks shooting them.  Of course, now, a lot of compound shooters are switching to x-guns, an even easier way to deliver an accurate arrow.

It's because the traditional bow is more difficult, and requires more skill and effort on the part of the shooter, that I choose to shoot one.  Though I feel like I do quite well, there's no doubt that I could/would have killed more and bigger critters had I been hunting with a compound these past 50 or so years.  During that time, I've passed on a lot of shots that were beyond my range. They would have been chip shots for a compound.  

But for me, it's not how many or how big, it's how i do it that's important.
old buck

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Reply with quote  #7 
Kind of why I quit rifle hunting...my heart just doesn't pound like a deer inside twenty yards. For me longer ranges are boring plus a stick is much quicker than a contraption.
Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #8 

I only want to hunt with a traditional bow for a number of reasons that are very important to me now.

 

However, it seems to me that hunting with a traditional bow has a significant handicap in that one must be a much better hunter to succeed.  One must work much harder at the hunting portion of hunting in general and bowhunting in particular.

 

It seems to me that it is much easier to get within 20 yards of a deer (the traditional bow range for many) than it is to get within 12 to 15 yards of a deer (my personal effective ethical range with a traditional bow).  It seems much easier to get within 40 yards of a deer (easily still within compound bow range) than it is to get within 20 yards of a deer.  It seems much easier to get within 50 yards (crossbow and slug shotgun range) than 30 to 40 yards of a deer.

 

I currently still tremendously enjoy hunting more with a traditional bow rather than a compound bow, a crossbow, a black powder firearm, or a modern firearm (I have experience with all of them).  I am just motivated to become a much better hunter rather than depending on the long reach of my weapon to compensate for my hunting shortcomings.  I still have a long way to go in regard to my accuracy with a traditional bow plus my hunting abilities. But that is just part of the fun!


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Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

Tom M

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Reply with quote  #9 

I used a compound for about 6 years. I shot with sights and Barebow. This was late 70’s. Game where I hunted wasn’t that plentiful so we wanted what advantages we could use. It was quite a shock the first time I hunted in AZ. No cover like in the woods of IL. Ca. was better but not much, I had to learn to be more proficient at longer ranges like 35-40 yards. Compound bow made that happen easier. But, after I had a bow failure and I had started to lose my “have to kill something “ attitude I picked up my Bear SK and never looked back. “Hunting” became more enjoyable and I still don’t mind if I don’t use a tag. 


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Sun City, Az. by way of San Diego, Ca. Bear TD's Wes Wallace Royal LB, ILF risers and various limbs, Vintage Works 1962 Kodiak reproduction made to my specs

I hunt public land.
Bisch

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Reply with quote  #10 

There is no doubt that a compound with letoff and sights is more accurate that any bow with no letoff and no sights!!!!! There is also no doubt that a compound enables a person to be more accurate at distances beyond which that person would even take a shot with no sights. 


Like stated above, it is the fact that it is so much harder, and takes so much more work to be accurate with no sights and no letoff that makes the successes when done that way that much more rewarding!

Yes, it is a handicap, but if a guy gets good enough to be successful, it is also possible to be plenty successful with a trad bow! Lots of guys have proven that over the years.

Bisch


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Primal Tech longbow 50#@29”
Primal Tech recurve 50#@29”
Sarrels Blueridge longbow 50#@29”
Sarrels Bobcatt TD recurve 50#@29.5"
Rob Green selfbow 47#@29”
Lonnie Dye composite 48#@29”

I hail from about 4hrs southwest of Tim King! [biggrin]
BAPilot2

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Reply with quote  #11 

The way I see it...

Traditional is an advantage in it’s simplicity and it’s lack of weight.


Compounds hold the advantage in their inherent accuracy which is directly related to their let-off, sights, fall-away rests, caliper release, etc.  The need for honing ones form and shooting abilities is not required, to the same extent, with a compound as compared to traditional archery.  

 

Once you learn to shoot a compound bow you can put it away for months, or even years, and then pick it up a few days before your next hunt and, within a few shots, be shooting well enough to reliably take game out to 30 or 40 yards. 


Try that with a longbow or recurve.  It can’t be done as easily.  

 

Traditional requires a commitment to the sport in order to maintain ones proficiency.  And that commitment is where we find the joy of archery.  It gives me a greater sense of accomplishment to be proficient with my longbow or recurve as compared to my compound bow.  How can that be a disadvantage???

It’s all in ones perception. 


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Steve Graf

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BAPilot2
...Traditional requires a commitment to the sport in order to maintain ones proficiency.  And that commitment is where we find the joy of archery.  It gives me a greater sense of accomplishment to be proficient with my longbow or recurve as compared to my compound bow.  How can that be a disadvantage?...


I was cringing a bit as I clicked on this thread.  There seems to be a bad case of self-righteousness going around these days.  But I was pleased to see that most of the comments in this thread were spot-on and thoughtful.  BAPilot2's words quoted here pretty well sum up my feelings about it.

Thanks fella's for making my morning coffee time better this morning!
CTDolan

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Reply with quote  #13 
I've hunted with all forms of bow, except a crossbow (which I've never even shot, much less used on a hunt). I pretty much feel the same as what most have to say above. With today's compound bows it's not too difficult to shoot tight groups out to 40 yards and beyond. In a hunting capacity, though, they're rather limiting as they're slow to get off the shot. They're not dynamic. It's a bit of an awkward process...draw, settle into anchor, aim, release. When I shoot my longbow it is one continuous, fluid motion. As for range, I'm not uncomfortable taking a shot beyond 30 yards if the situation allows (which is rare, actually). I like to set up for a 12-15 yard shot but longer is doable under the right circumstances. It simply takes practice, not so much at a target but in the field, stump shooting and the like (or, if you do go to a range, toss out a pine cone and make it your target...your toss might land it at 15 yards...the first hit sends it out to 20, the next 25, and so on). It's much better practice than shooting at a target.
Sam

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Reply with quote  #14 
Technologically, trad is very much a disadvantage. With a compound greater accuracy at longer distances is not difficult for most people. However, as time has gone by I find myself, along with many others, realizing that the close range experience is just as pleasurable as a more or less sure kill was in the past. In that context, there is no disadvantage for me.
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Sam McMichael

Gray, GA

"The spirit of the bow dwells in the heart of all young men" - Geronimo

Hill Wesley Special (2, both 65#)
Hill Cheetah (2, one 55# and one 40#)
Hill Big 5 (50#)
NM Shelton (2, both 53#)
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Archery Traditions Bamboo Longhunter (3, one 56#, one 60# and one 78#)

longcruise

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Reply with quote  #15 
Compound is an advantage in the west where just 10 or 15 yards closer would allow the shot.  Trad has some handling advantages in terms of bow orientation and less thingamajigs to deal with.   If it's a killing advantage that one is looking for,  it's definitely the wheel bow . . . Unless you are as good as Bisch, which im surely not! 🙂
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WhistlingBadger

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Reply with quote  #16 
Yep, out west in the wide-open to semi-open country a lot of us hunt, a compound with its 50+ yard range is a huge advantage.  As Fallhunt pointed out, the sneak gets exponentially harder the closer you get, and doubly so in open country.  I suspect wheely bows would also be a big advantage for people who live in town and can't practice constantly like a lot of us do.  

But here's something I've noticed pretty much every time I've shot with a mix of compound and trad shooters:  The wheely shooters are shooting much tighter groups and racking up higher scores, but the trad guys are smiling and laughing a lot more.

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Old3Toe

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Reply with quote  #17 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WhistlingBadger
I suspect wheely bows would also be a big advantage for people who live in town and can't practice constantly like a lot of us do.  


There is much truth in this. Proficiency with traditional bows requires a significant investment of time and determination—which is a commitment and a luxury that many/most modern archers just don’t have. Maybe that also explains part of the fun factor too?


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Jet Wolverine 69@28, Kramer Autumn 62@27, Jet Leopard 63@28, Howard Hill Wesley Special 57@27, Jet Warthog 69@28. Two Tracks Echo 60@27.

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