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silverarrow
pros and cons (if any)?
TAS, TBOT member, Buffalo Archery Club, Cypress, Tx.
Dryad/ACS Orion 53#
Great Northern Fireball JK 54#
Northern Mist American TD 51#
Howard Hill, The Big Five (Tim Meigs) 57#
Sovereign Sonoran 58#
Browning Wasp 52#
Ryan Gill Osage Hunter (self bow) 52#
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timking
Dave,
my only experience is with a stalker Wolverine
it is extremely fast, pretty smooth and accurate.

it probably has a little detectable bump at release When tips go forward compared to some of my others
But not a deterrent  to me 
Again, my only real experience 

I believe CC has/had an RER or two

Dallas, Texas
62" #55 Fox High Sierra 
62" #58 Black Widow MA
64" #56 A&H ACS 
Widowmaker 350 Carbon shafts
200 gr. Iron Will 4 blade



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Old Sailor
I have a Sovereign Ballistik with static tips.. It is a very fast and smooth shooting bow.  My favorite of the 3 recurves I have.
Charter Member Traditional Archery Society
Member Colorado Traditional Archery Society

JD Berry Morning Star 54#@28, Northern Mist Classic 54#@28Sovereign Ballistik 60#28, Howatt Hunter 55#@28, Ben Pearson Mustang 46#@28

"But God demonstrates His own love towards us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us."  Romans 5:8

"The problem is not guns, It's hearts without God, Homes without discipline, Schools without prayer, and Courtrooms without justice" ; unknown.

Durango, Colorado
Public Land Hunter
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silverarrow
every comment I ever heard regarding speed with STR is that it was fast and smooth, but I can say that about most recurves I've shot.  Are they more difficult to string?  If a bowyer has a STR and a full working recurve in his lineup, is the STR most likely to be a hair quicker?  Would either a STR or a full working limb be more stabile or forgiving?  Looking at the 2 different recurve limbs using my logic (often not correct) tells me that a full working tip would produce more energy.  I guess I really don't undertand the concept engineering wise.
TAS, TBOT member, Buffalo Archery Club, Cypress, Tx.
Dryad/ACS Orion 53#
Great Northern Fireball JK 54#
Northern Mist American TD 51#
Howard Hill, The Big Five (Tim Meigs) 57#
Sovereign Sonoran 58#
Browning Wasp 52#
Ryan Gill Osage Hunter (self bow) 52#
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Draven
My Border HEX 6.5 have the advantage of Static tip incorporated in design. The tips don't bend past vertical line at full draw and the static tips are harder to be taken out of alignment. When there was nothing but wood, the next step were static tips that at the end became the siyahs from the eastern archery bows.
The eastern bowyers idea was to have a bow who's pulling more / 1" on the 1st part of the  draw and less / 1" at the end of it - something the SuperCurves are doing. I imagine the "smoothness" of the static tips recurve is coming from this difference in how you feel the poundage increasing on your finger tips. The additional energy stored in the limb reflex before the tip is the other "good" and it can be seen in the performance. I've read somewhere about a rule regarding the design of the bow / limbs and energy: a limb accumulates it until the string lifts off the limbs. After that is mostly material. Longer travel of the string on the limb, better design / performance bow you have.
"Practice not until you get it right, practice until you can't get it wrong." - Unknown
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fdp
Strictly depends on who you ask.

Keep in mind that static tips were replaced for the most part in the recurve world when the working recurve was developed. And they have never become prominent again. Particularly in factory production bows.

I've never seen any legitimate bow test that showed that static tip recurves were any faster than working recurves when made from similar material and shooting the same weight arrows. They may be out there, but I haven't seen them.

But, they do have a certain cool factor going for them.
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James Donahue
fdp X 2
 
Colonial Beach, Virginia
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fewfeathers
Static tips shorten the working section of the limb, which speeds up the bow somewhat. Where it really helps is maintaining a better string angle than a dynamic tip. The effect is like shooting a longer heavier limb to get the same string angle.
There's another huge benefit for shooting at moving targets from odd positions or from horseback. The bowyer can design the draw force curve to flatten beyond a certain draw length rather than stacking. This helps in dynamic situations where our draw length varies from shot to shot. Arrow trajectory will very far less as the draw weight varies very little as our draw length varies.
For me, shooting stationary targets from flat ground (classic target style) the difference is subtle. It's like what flavor ice cream do I want today.
But, when it's quick fast and in a hurry from whatever odd position I'm in, the results  down range are much better.
Disclaimer: I don't shoot from horseback. 
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fdp
Actually the moving targets analogy isn't completely true.

I reproduce, as well as travel around the country to museums and look at lots and lots of bows that were made and used by native American horse archers and foot archers. I have yet to see a natural materials bow whether recurved, double curved, deflexed, or flat that had static tips of the type that we are discussing here.  And they were the best horse archers that lived on this continent. 

There are some examples of straight or flatbows that could be considered to have static tips.

The static tip doesn't shorten the working section of the limb, because the bow still has to expend energy to move it, just like it does on a working recurve. The only advantage that the static tip MAY add is the fact that the static acts as a lever, which in theory should add some cast to the bow. The issue is that in the vast majority of static tip bows the tips are too heavy. In many cases the last 1/3 of the limb of a static tip bow doesn't just weigh as much as a working recurve, it weighs more. That fact negates any theoretical gain in limb speed, which translates into arrow speed that may have been possible.

One of the pound for pound most efficient designs to have ever been produced was the Wilcox Duo-Flex and it had very large working recurves. Essentially that's what the builders of SR's are doing now. They are using materials that allow them to create long working recurves.

Ancient cultures used static recurves due to the fact that they didn't have materials that were easily obtainable that would allow them to build working recurves. In their world static tips were easier to build, and more durable.
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longcruise
The wilcox Duo flex is an amazing achievement in my opinion.  And without carbon! 🙂

I find a static recurve to be more forgiving than a conventional recurve.
Longcruise
Colorado PUBLIC LAND HUNTER
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fdp
One reason that static tips CAN be more accurate for some shooters (but it isn't a blanket statement) is because in 9 out 10 designs there are is less string contacting a shorter section of limb on a static. The more the string lies on the limb of a recurve at brace, the more energy producing potential it has. However, it is also more prone to torsional twisting induced by us, as well as a few other idiosyncracy's.
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fewfeathers
Hmmm, See if I can sort this out. Stiffen part of the limb so it doesn't bend,you shorten the bendy (working) part. The whole limb is a lever. The stiffer the lever, the greater the leverage. The longer the lever, the greater the leverage. The heavier the lever, the greater the inertia. Weight on the outer limb (the part that moves the farthest) has more effect on speed of the limb than in the working section. 
Bowyers have been juggling these trade offs for thousands of years using materials and technology available to them. I'm amazed at how quickly the American Plains cultures developed their bows so soon after they got horses. They used construction methods and materials similar to Asian cultures.  And they didn't have access to the internet. American cultures had to poke holes in in big critters from close up. They, later, used them against critters that shot bullets at them. They were vary adept at getting in fairly close. They could reload and shoot more accurately than the bullet shooters. They were the finest light cavalry on earth. Asian archers developed their bows for a different strategies.
I believe the OP was asking about modern bows. We now have modern materials, construction methods and greater scope of shared information.
There are some very elegant solutions to the same physics we've always dealt with. Duo-Flex is certainly one of them. As are Adcock's limb profile and static tips without heavy siyahs. Which is best? It depends on what you want. If it's raw speed, Duo-Flex and Adcock's design provide. However, some of the fastest bows ever built had siyahs. In the U.S. there are more static tipped bows produced by more bowyers than the other two. I don't know if it's superior or easier and more cost effective or Copy Right constraints. I have and shoot all three. 
I have a Miegs Duo-Flex, an Adcock and static limbed bows from Toelke, Stalker and Bear( late 50's vintage.) Which do I prefer? 
Of course, my experience with these and a few others puts my highly subjective, opinionated opinion and judgement squarely in the anecdotal category. Of the three (four if we throw in Asian bows), I prefer static limbed bows.  
Do I prefer static over dynamic recurves? It depends on what flavor I want on a given day. 
I have two Stalker bows, same specs. One is static. One is dynamic. Of the two, I prefer the static. 
they feel similar. The static limbed version is noticeably faster. There's that shorter working limp thing. Between the Stalker static and the Toelke Super Static (same draw weight): The stalker is like wielding the Hammer of Thor. The Toelke is a little gentler and more forgiving. It has a shorter riser and longer limbs. It's not as fast as the Stalker.It has a longer working limb. Toelke makes a shorter static recurve that is faster-shorter working limb. What endears the Toelke is it's draw force curve and long sweet spot. If I'm having a bad day, I don't look quite as bad. It also excels (at least for me) at shooting ariel targets. I should say I don't miss by quite as much.
The benefit of a flat spot in the draw weight as you come to draw is not an "analogy". This was explained and demonstrated to me by a very accomplished Horse Archery competitor. I've since, heard and read about this from other sources.
Horse archery events are colorful and fascinating. Participants use many types of bows: Yumis, flat bows, eastern Native American bows, Native American plains style bows, static recurves from near east and far east, primitive construction and modern. Each weapon fits the individual archer's psyche. It's their passion and they excel no matter the trade off or advantage.   



  
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fewfeathers
silverarrow wrote:
every comment I ever heard regarding speed with STR is that it was fast and smooth, but I can say that about most recurves I've shot.  Are they more difficult to string?  If a bowyer has a STR and a full working recurve in his lineup, is the STR most likely to be a hair quicker?  Would either a STR or a full working limb be more stabile or forgiving?  Looking at the 2 different recurve limbs using my logic (often not correct) tells me that a full working tip would produce more energy.  I guess I really don't undertand the concept engineering wise.

Silverarrow, Here's a shorter answer than my post above. I have two Stalker recurves. Both are 62",45#, identical strings shooting the same arrows. One is static. The other is a working recurve. The static is noticeably faster. I couldn't tell you if one is more stable or forgiving than the other. I can grab the tip on either one and can't twist it. They are both stable and very quiet for recurves. I use a Selway stringer and don't notice any more difficulty stringing the static. 
Your logic concerning full working tips isn't exactly flawed. However, the more the tip "works" or uncurls the less work it's actually doing. As it snaps forward, it does adds a small amount of energy. The stiffer the tip the more work it actually does. As it gets stiffer, it works the rest of the limb more. The more you work the greater part of the limb, the faster the whole thing recovers. Modern bowyers using modern materials have juggled the the trade offs and come up with some great solutions. Modern static tips are imperceptably heavier than older types adding almost no additional inertia. I know a number of guys that went to STRs and swear by them. For me, it's not magic. I get a bit more speed without sacrificing shootability.
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fdp
If the bow has to move the weight of the limb, it is part of the working limb in the context of the energy used to move it. Any bow, regardless of the limb design (static or working) can and in many cases does have a flat spot related to the draw weight. 

Again, I've never seen a head to head test that shows that a static tipped recurve was or is faster than a working tip recurve of similar design. 

There may perhaps be a misunderstanding/miscommunication of what is being termed a "siyah" based on the statements related to speed. 
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Yehwa
I had a Static tip compound. Those brackets and wheels really cast a arrow 😂😂😂😂😂😂😂
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