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Bigmagic

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Reply with quote  #1 
Am I the only one who has a heck of a time getting my cedar shafts to straighten? No matter what I seem to do, when I get them on my crester, it is a pain to get the cresting to be right in some places. It's not quite so much for shooting them for me, but they make it difficult to crest.

I use an ACE Roll-R-Straight  on a marble piece that I have. I've tried hand straightening them but I can't seem to get it right. Any advice?
Selden Slider

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Reply with quote  #2 
I don't want to seem sarcastic but you should switch suppliers.  Shafts today should be straight when you buy them.  I buy from Surewood for Doug Fir and Addictive Archery for POC.  No problems with either.  Frank
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timking

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Reply with quote  #3 
My suggestion was going to be to use them for kindling and get some carbon … so you’re probably better off listening to Frank’s suggestion!
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Dallas, Texas
62" #55 Fox High Sierra 
62" #58 Black Widow MA
64" #56 A&H ACS 
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Jack Skinner

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Reply with quote  #4 
Heat
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Jack Skinner

Self Bows, OE's; Heritage, Vixen, Misty Dawn, Heritage II x 2 "The Twins", North Star x 2 Crown Jewel and Cousin It, 7 Lakes SF Carolina Night, Miller Sage, Ramer, Schulz Grandpa, Sunset Hill, Shelton

Cheyenne WY
chuckc

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Reply with quote  #5 
Make certain your nock holder and first contact point are pretty much in line.

Buy or adapt your crester to have a roller or pressure bar on top.  Keep the bottom contact points ( nock holder and first pressure point ) relatively tight together, not "either end of the shaft).    I will add a guess...if the outside pressure point has a LIttle bit of play the arrow can move there, if it needs to, not at the work zone.

Place arrows in the crester as you are finishing the straightening so you can see where you are at in the process.   A pencil held so contact is made only at the high spots will mark "the spots".

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ChuckC

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I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Green

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Reply with quote  #6 
You have the Ace roller.....maybe this technique will help.  




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Old3Toe

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Reply with quote  #7 
This technique works...I just use a screwdriver tho. 
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Randall J Hoyt

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Reply with quote  #8 

This is a Grayling arrow straightener. I use first on the shift only to determine if I will make a arrow with it. Then again just before Cresting the arrow. I also use on finished arrows as required to straighten them. My goal is +/- .0025 between rollers through out the length of the arrow. I feel Douglas Fir are harder to get to that because of the grain height versus Cedar arrows however I feel they stay straighter longer.

570EFE93-F451-40E1-9E55-B492AFEEEC71.jpeg 



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Tom M

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Reply with quote  #9 

I use the Ace gizmo as well but really crooked ones I heat with my heat gun first. As for cresting I use a Spinrite or a Phillips crester both designed to move the wobble out of the cresting area of the shaft. I have another straightener that must weight a pound. Has a groove in center and you force it along to compress the fibers in the shaft. I bought it when I was into hardwood shafting. 

 I was told straighting wood shafts is an on going process when making up arrows. So at each set when I pick up the shaft I check them. 


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Sun City, Az. by way of San Diego, Ca. Bear TD's Wes Wallace Royal LB, ILF risers and various limbs, Vintage Works 1962 Kodiak reproduction made to my specs

I hunt public land.
fdp

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Reply with quote  #10 
There are lots of different ways to straighten wooden arrows and they all work. It's just a matter of finding the method that works best for YOU.

Also keep in mind that in the list of things that are important within a set of arrows they are spine, physical weight, and straightness in that order of importance.
James Donahue

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Reply with quote  #11 
I just spin across my thumb nail  and Eyeball them and  straighten  with my hand

seem to work for  my level of shooting

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Steve Graf

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Reply with quote  #12 
I use an ace straightener, or a beer bottle.  I agree with the fellows that don't worry about it too much.  Pretty straight is good enough for me when it comes to wood arrows.

I am no great shot, but in my experience straightness is an over-rated measure of an arrows worth.  I can see how a crooked arrow would be a pain to crest though...
James Calamaris

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Reply with quote  #13 
All I do is hand straighten off the heel of my hand and eye balling down the shaft. I get a perfectly straight shaft when done and they spin true. It takes a lot of patience and time.
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Jim Calamaris 
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longcruise

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Calamaris
All I do is hand straighten off the heel of my hand and eye balling down the shaft. I get a perfectly straight shaft when done and they spin true. It takes a lot of patience and time.


Do it the same and sometimes apply a little heat over a stove burner.  Yesterday I came across some very old arrows with one in the bunch that had an actual kink in it.  Got a little too aggressive and broke it right at the kink.  Might have been for the best.  🙂

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Longcruise
Colorado PUBLIC LAND HUNTER
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