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stickandstring

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have two by Hunter Safety System and Muddy.

Both are OK but...., one is a little uncomfortable and has straps preventing access to pockets and the other thin leg straps so if you were to fall, would cut off your circulation real fast.

Anyhow, does anybody know a harness which is well thought out, comfortable and fit of the purpose?

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Deno

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hope this helps.  

https://www.reloaderaddict.com/best-tree-stand-harness-treestand-safety-big-game-review/


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eno

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stickandstring

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Reply with quote  #3 
My observations; The tether should be about 2/3 up your back not at the neck. The beefed up shoulder and back straps like you see on most is totally unnecessary. But you do need padding or at least wider straps under your legs. This is where your weight will be in a fall. You need a support strap across the chest not at the waist. And need tie downs at the wast for climbing belt. The design should also allow access to waist pockets you should not be encumbered.

Most hunting harness are all gimmicks, and to me total crap. Look at industrial harnesses and you see what I mean.

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eddie c

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Reply with quote  #4 
I've read on other sites where guys are using rock climbing harness due to design and comfort.
The overly beefed up harnesses are more than likely due to liability insurance requirements.
I've only have used Summit and HSS vests. I had gained weight and Summit didn't offer a vest in my size is the only reason I went to HSS. I sure was glad I had it on when that step broke.

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jwhitetail

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Reply with quote  #5 
I came out of the rock/alpine climbing world out here in the west, and have simply adapted those tools to life in the trees with a trad bow.  I wear my old, Black Diamond alpine Bod harness with a sliding cord that is prusik knotted onto a main anchor line. Works great for me - very safe and convenient.
JW



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Mgmicky

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Reply with quote  #6 
I use the exact same rock climbing harness set up as jwhitetail.  So much lighter and easier than a standard tree stand harness.  I initially got it because the majority of our season here is in the 90s and I wanted something cooler than my Summit.  Now I won’t go back to a regular hunting harness.  I’m right handed and found that if I place the connecting tether on my right side, I don’t have any interference with it or my lifeline.  Highly recommend
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jwhitetail

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Reply with quote  #7 
Good note Mgmicky - a hunter has figure out how you will be shooting (which side) and keep the cords/tether running to the opposite.  Not hard to do at all on my stands as I generally am oriented to pivot one way for the shot (right) and it works fine with the tether.  It still lets you orient left to some degree if you leave yourself a hair of slack.  This system leaves you protected going up - when your on stand and back down.

Also, another trick is - on the stand - to run a piece of 5 or 7mm cord (I have even used a 1 inch cam strap in a pinch) around the tree behind you - just above the small of the back (and above a limb on the back side), and then around front of the belly (and clip in with a locking carabiner on the front side the BD harness). This lets me catch myself if I were ever to slip, and I find I can actually lean out and into the cord a bit for stability when making a shot.... then you don't have to monkey with a tether running to the right side - you can freely pivot inside the loop.  I then just get out of that and clip into the anchor line with the prusik cord to descend safely.  The down side there is there are moments in transition between systems when you are not protected from a fall.  I know lots of folks won't like that system, but I sort of dreamed it up and it works for the way I hunt.

JW

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thumper

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Reply with quote  #8 
The rock climbing harness is the way to go. The front connection is actually kinda nice. Just tuck the tether into the back waist of the harness and it's totally out of the way. If you fall it just pulls out and works as intended. They are lighter and cheaper as well. Mine is a Black Diamond Momentum but about any of them will do. Runs about $50. 

I worked at Seat O' The Pants for 5 years and you will NEVER catch me in a "treestand" harness again. I've watched the 600lb dummy fall in them, and done it myself and it's not pleasant. Plus it will kill ya if you can't get down. But a rock climbing harness is no big deal at all. 
stickandstring

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Reply with quote  #9 
Guys, thanks for all the great information. My focus will get a rock climbing belt.
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chuckc

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Reply with quote  #10 
A couple thoughts out loud...wear something, preferably from the time you leave the ground till you get back down.

In my mind, hunting style safety harnesses are designed with several things in mind different from climbing harnesses. First, they are designed so you can have all the stuff behind you, hopefully out of the way. They are designed to hang you upright, if you do fall. Waist high connections, like the old belts, will leave you hanging upside down half the time, maybe more, depending upon your shape. They were designed to not crush your ribs on impact, like the belts were often doing ( to me). Using a hunting style harness properly means adjusting your tether strap such that it just tugs when you are sitting. You shouldn't be able to fall, from your stand, more than a foot or so. In some cases they keep you in the stand by hitting that end of the rope.


About the " it'll kill ya" part. They were NOT designed for long term hanging. Yeah, long term hanging can cause issues.

Ask yourself this question...if you are in such health that you cannot move to save yourself, or have arrangements for someone to get there quickly to help...what are you doing in a tree ? Needing to be in a tree to kill a deer is a fallacy.

Pick something comfortable and easy for you to use, and use it, every time.

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I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Orion

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hmmmm.  I've been using my own design safety harness of sorts for quite a long time.  It's actually just a painter's loop.  I sew the ends of 13-14 feet of one-inch tube webbing together, then sew about half the length of the belt together every 5-6 inches (like a daisy chain).  That's the part that goes around the tree.  I slip the large open loop through the end 5-inch end loop and snug the resulting circle of webbing tight to the tree.  The large open loop left over goes around me.  I keep it at chest level and snug to my body by using bungee cord tied around the two pieces of webbing forming the large loop.

When I use my climbing stand, I just manually move the loop around the tree up as I go.  When I'm hanging Lone Wolf tree steps, I sit in the loop with my feet/foot on the ground or on a tree step, so I have both hands free to attach subsequent steps. Again, I move the loop around the tree up as I move up.  When I get to the desired level, I use a carabiner from the first five-inch loop from my body to the appropriate 5-inch loop wrapped around the tree to remove most of the slack in the webbing between the tree and me.

This arrangement has kept me from falling a few times when I've dozed off on all day sits.  If I ever do roll out of the stand, my upper body won't move more than a couple of feet.  And, because the loop around my body is expandable, held there with a bungee cord, it should be an easy to work my arms and myself out of the loop should that be necessary to shinny down the tree or climb back into the stand.  

When not in use, the belt rolls up into a circle about the size of a Bear claw pastry -- light, strong, quiet, small, easy to use and sufficient.  

Of course, there are a few drawbacks.  It's sometimes necessary to remove the belt on the way up the tree to circumvent a limb, etc. but that's the case with most other safety systems as well.  That is overcome with a rope around the tree trunk or sturdy limb from above stand level to the ground with a tether attached to the hunter via a Prussic knot. Unless the rope is thrown over a limb, the first climb to attach the rope to the tree is made without the tether though.  I probably should, but do not, use that device.

Too, unless one is diligent in keeping the large loop tight around the chest, it can slip down to the waist, or even ankles.  That's very dangerous because if one slipped then, one would end up perhaps upside down hanging from the stomach or ankles.  Unless you're an acrobat and in very good shape, it would be about impossible to extricate oneself in that situation. Hmmm.  I think I might incorporate another bungee cord, over my shoulder from chest to back to keep that from happening.  

I'm not necessarily advocating this system.  Just describing something that's worked for me for about 40 years now.  









 




stickandstring

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Reply with quote  #12 
Update. I ended up buying a Bolerton Harness from Sportsman Guide. It’s on sale for $25 and change. The pictures showed me everything I was wanting.
Im using it right now writing from my tree. Beautiful morning, no bambies yet...
It has plenty of adjustments and is truly comfortable. The leg straps are padded and connected by release buckles. The buckles have an insulator preventing them from making any noise. For once I can access easily my chest and hand pockets. The tether is about a foot shorter than my other “famous brand harnesses” attaches to the tree at about neck height. The other ones had me climbing up the tree to get the right tension. Also the tether is spring loaded and really nice feeling. The connection is about 2/3 up your back not at your neck. I used to find that really uncomfortable and would interfere with my hat. Another nice thing the tether does not interfere with my binocular chest straps.
Anyhow, can not say enough good things about the Bolerton.

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James Calamaris

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Reply with quote  #13 
Seat O Pants the best out there.
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