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Traditional Archers | Bowhunters
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skookum

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Reply with quote  #1 
I remember, in 1953, seeing a dozen or more used yew longbows, most in excellent condition, in a corner of Frank Eicholtz's archery shop in San Diego.  He was selling them for about $3 to $8 each.  These had been traded in for the new fiberglass laminated recurve bows.  (I bet that these old longbows would be worth a fortune today!)

20 years later, in 1973, I was in Glen St.Charles N.W. Archery shop and I noticed a bunch of used recurve bows that he took in on trade for the hot, new, Jennings compound bows (he was selling the trade-ins cheap).  Now, over 40 years later, those old recurves seem to be more popular (and expensive) than ever!  I speculate on what new and exciting things will be created to lure the bow-benders 40 or 60 years from now. 

I've noticed that some archery products that have been around 50 or 60 years are still popular (Ace and Bear broadheads for example).  I also puzzle over what old things will still be around...I paid $3.75 a dozen for my first Bear broadheads...what would they cost in 2060?  Noting that we humans are wonderfully creative cusses, I meditate on what the future will bring.  Will we still be able to recognize our sport... or will it morph into something non-distinct?????

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chuckc

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Reply with quote  #2 
We have made more serious changes in the last 75 years than in all the entire rest of the time modern man has been on this earth. The first time I used a computer at work was mid 1989. Since that time computers have gotten more powerful than what the first NASA folks had for rocket guidance, and we all have one in our face every day of the week.

I guess that in another 50 years we will be unrecognizable. There will be no more real outdoors and animals. Sad...

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ChuckC

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Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
jaz5833

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Reply with quote  #3 
Change is inevitable, no matter how we feel about it.

Would the first Daytona Beach racers approve of todays NASCAR? Probaby not. But there are still some guys that race old cars on old tracks.

Would the Wright brothers approve of modern aircraft? I think so. Even so, some of the first aircraft ever built still fly.

Would we approve tomorrows archers and the way they enjoy their sport....maybe not. But I'm guessing at least a few will enjoy a simple stick and string or early recurve.

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matnes86

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Reply with quote  #4 
I was talking archery with my dad who used to shoot a lot in his youth. We started talking about the price of things, arrows, broad heads, feathers, etc. He couldn't believe how expensive things were and the fact that if you need them, the only place to buy it is online.
It's so different now. Even I remember (and I'm only 50 years old) going to the local archery shop, walking in the door and being hit by the smells of paint and glues, and seeing all the wood arrows and all the different fletchings and bows.
I have recently this year got into archery and I'm consumed by it. In fact, as a Christmas present for my sons I have made each of them a half dozen arrows in their favorite colors. They have also been bitten by the archery bug.
By the way, my bow is a Fred Anderson 68", 60#@28 longbow and I enjoy it. Got my eyes looking for a lighter weight, say, 45#, but I realize they're hard to find.
Been hunting this year with it as well. No luck yet. Still a few more weeks for the season.


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matnes86
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Reply with quote  #5 
2060 is a good ways off.  I know I won't see it.  Archery in 2060?  Sure computerized bows that shoot themselves with guidance systems to ensure a hit.  I say hit and not kill because by 2060 hunting will most likely be a thing of the past.  We're seeing the start of that now.  Federal land grabs and sales, liberal movements to stop our sport.  Oh, that poor lion, what's his name?  I hate to think about it but I'm sure glad I won't be around.  Frank
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Sam

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Reply with quote  #6 
In the future, very few things will resemble anything we commonly use today. However, we humans have always had a desire to re-examine the past. Therefore, I believe there will still be a small cadre who use and understand traditional archery. Who knows, some of our current members may be revered as enlightened Old Masters. However, it's kind of scary to think some of these symbols of the "good old days" may be known by such names as Tim King, skookum, and chuckc - or even LBhunter 63.
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Sam McMichael

Gray, GA

"The spirit of the bow dwells in the heart of all young men" - Geronimo

Hill Wesley Special (2, both 65#)
Hill Cheetah (2, one 55# and one 40#)
Hill Big 5 (50#)
NM Shelton (2, both 53#)
Deathwish Longbow (59#)
Archery Traditions Bamboo Longhunter (3, one 56#, one 60# and one 78#)

chuckc

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Reply with quote  #7 
Sam...you are a part of this too ! I wonder if campfires will even be allowed..on the other hand...one great catastrophe and stick bows might be very valuable, and renewable tools.
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ChuckC

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Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Lbhunter63

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Reply with quote  #8 
Any of us will be lucky to still be enjoying them if they are!
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- LB - 
HHA - Big Five, 93@28"; Schulz American Longbow - Trophy Hunter, 83@28"; HHA - Big Five, 80@28"; Chastain - Wapiti T/D, 77@28"; Bighorn Longbow, 75@28"; Northern Mist Classic, 75@28"; Zebra - Grevy, 74@28"; HHA - Jaguar, 70@28"; HHA - Wesley Special, 70@28"; Kramer - Autumn, 70@28"; Great Plains - Rio Bravo T/D,70@28"; Kramer - Autumn, 74@30";  Kramer - Big Five, 65@28"; Ben Pearson - Hunter, 65@28"; Herter's - Perfection Mag T/D, 64@28"; Bear - Super Kodiak, 60@28"; New Wood - Legacy, 58@28"; Bear - Grizzly, 55@28"

Dedicated to preserving, promoting and hunting on public lands.

Club Member Traditional Archery Society and John Schulz' Shooting Straight Graduate
chuckc

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Reply with quote  #9 
That's only 40 and a bit years away Kent. Ima gonna be here !
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ChuckC

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Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
fewfeathers

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Reply with quote  #10 
There is only one thing I see that is little changed in the decades I've been alive. And will not change much by 2060. Perhaps we'll craft it from a different material than we use today. But, it's quality and function and technique of use will be the same. It's (to me) the most comforting link to the past: toilet paper (our most intimate link to the past)
Archery is a technology that precedes recorded history. It has survived long past being the best technology to feed ourselves and kill our neighbors. Archery survives because of our inherent need to amplify our physical and mental will. I know a lot of youngsters who regard stick and string as a more elegant and intimate tool for this than gadgets that are designed to eliminate as much of the human element as possible. Most of them enjoy learning of the history of archery as well. For them it's not nostalgia. Archery empowers them. And links them to a larger and ageless society. Most of them will be here in 2060. And bows will still be recognizable as stick and string.
As far as cost, equipment is (considering inflation) more affordable than ever thanks to the investment of many passionate bowyers and archers. 
I wasn't intentionally making an analogy between bows and toilet paper. But I guess I just did: Elegance of simplicity.
Of course, bows are a bit more sophisticated and require a little more coordination to master. And are more fun. And more acceptable to use in public.
Rick


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Reply with quote  #11 
I'm betting on my Skookum "Black Magic" to appreciate in value beyond calculations.

[image]

skookum

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Reply with quote  #12 
Fewfeathers, I agree with most of your point about bows needing a little more coordination to use than toilet paper; but I have observed that a lot of hunters, when out in the "Great Outdoors," seem to lose their toilet paper technique when they are leaning against a snow covered fallen log with one hand and manipulating the tissue with the other! [eek]
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chuckc

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Reply with quote  #13 
Technique ? OMG....hoping nobody does a YouTube on THAT technique....

"I just posted a video, can you guys check out my form and follow thru...how bout my release...I'm not plucking am i....or creeping. I use three anchor points including the tip of my nose....no clicker though..."

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ChuckC

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Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Winter Hawk

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Reply with quote  #14 
t.p. will probably be retro by then also!  "What, you're not using your Personal Sanitation Device?"[eek]

~WH~
fewfeathers

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Reply with quote  #15 
Personal sanitation device? Yup! Corn cobs. Remember those? 
Non-GMO corn cobs are getting harder to find. 
Can't use pages out of on-line catalogues either.
fewfeathers

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Reply with quote  #16 
Seriously, not trying to sidetrack a good topic. Couldn't resist a little humor.
My vote goes to "traditional" bows being recognizable and popular in the far distant future.
The more we "advance", the more we need activities that require skill development rather than instant expedience. 
We have a universal compound where I teach. Some of the youngsters try it and enjoy it. Then go beck to recurve. They like the feel and chalenge of a recurve. Our needs don't change. As we become more modern, there are fewer outlets for these needs. Our need for simple devises to satisfy these needs will increase rather than decrease. The more complicated a device or tool becomes, the less intimate it becomes. Yup! stick and string is here to stay.
Wherever TP evolves, on the other hand, I hope, becomes more reliable and less intimate.
Rick
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Reply with quote  #17 
Well lets go back to the mid 1970's.  The archers were ringing the death knell of recurves and longbows as the compound took over the industry.  Over 90% of archers took easily to the compound bow and very few hung to their traditional bows.  Fast forward and look at what we have today...buckets full of bowyers and other manufacturers creating more bows than were ever available prior to that stage of archery.  We didn't lose many companies, they just moved on to the bows most in demand at the time.  

I see no reason why it would descend into a fury of technology when we already went through it once and to an extent that most thought we would never recover.  Some of us kept our recurves during that time (1970's) and went back to them for one reason or another.  The sky really didn't fall completely and now our choices are significant.  I'm not a chicken little type and only see us holding relatively steady.  There will be those who leave the sport and we see that happening already by hunter numbers alone.  Here in Pa. we're down 300,000 hunters +/- over the past two decades.  That's where the biggest impact is happening.  That said, there will be a point when our numbers level out and we will again have a discussion or two about the direction of archery in general. 

I haven't been in archery as long as Fred, but only because I'm not as old as he, but I'm catching up. 😉.    We had good times in the past, but today there is more selection than ever and a lot more longbow makers than ever before.   It's still a good time to be in archery..even for old pharts like me.
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