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ShutterbugBowhunter
Good morning all.

I have been practicing quite a bit lately, especially close to last light scenarios and have noticed that some of my arrows are right of intended placement (for a right hand shooter).  I do consider my self slightly instinctual, but am likely what I would consider Gapstinctual).  My arrows are GT Traditional Classic XT with the faux footed shaft (dark purple) with the ballistic collar (I have made it silver by removing the black anodizing).  All this to say in a perfect scenario where the sky reflects on my arrow and I track that to my target with proper alignment I am spot on.  When trees and darkish skies do not reflect on the portion near the tip I believe my shot then goes to the right as my viewable arrow (for alignment) is shortened.  My question...Would or have any of you painted the lower couple inches of your arrow with white and or glow in the dark spraypaints.

The photo below is what the arrow looks like, and what I did to the ballistic collar.

117944104_325521002142999_2417129802817665611_n.jpg 

Thoughts are appreciated on the painting.  Opinions on aiming technique are wasted words and not worth the keyboard battles.  I am shooting an arrow out of a a traditional bow!
Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


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Randall J Hoyt
I paint the last 2 inches of the tip end white if I don’t dip the tip end white. 90% of my arrows I dip in white primer and let drip dry to increase foc weight and arrow weight and I see the tip better out of the corner eye in low light.
3C13261C-5ED2-443C-9534-26E37FADDD69.jpeg 

Kalamazoo, MI

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Orion
I don't anymore, but did 40-50 years ago when I sometimes used gap aiming.  It was quite common for gap shooters to paint a half-inch or so behind the point back in the day.  Some still do it.  Not much new in archery..
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Tom M
First time I saw this was a chapter in the “Master of the Barebow” video. Can’t recall the archers name, he used some kind of grey finish. I use about an 1 1/2” piece of aluminum shaft for footing my carbons. I removed the finish with a file when I am smoothing out the edges. Yes, it comes into my sight picture when I am lining up on the target.
Charter Member Traditional Archery Society

Sun City, Az. by way of San Diego, Ca. Bear TD's Wes Wallace Royal LB, ILF risers and various limbs, Vintage Works 1962 Kodiak reproduction made to my specs

I hunt public land.
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timking
Shawn,
I have used a 1” strip of reflective tape (arrow wrap) behind the point/broadhead with good results, they will wear off but no faster than paint

(side note, appreciate your comment about aiming styles, before I saw that I was thinking, “ here we go”..)

Dallas, Texas
62" #55 Fox High Sierra 
62" #58 Black Widow MA
64" #56 A&H ACS 
Widowmaker 350 Carbon shafts
200 gr. Iron Will 4 blade



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ShutterbugBowhunter
timking wrote:
Shawn,
I have used a 1” strip of reflective tape (arrow wrap) behind the point/broadhead with good results, they will wear off but no faster than paint

(side note, appreciate your comment about aiming styles, before I saw that I was thinking, “ here we go”..)


Thanks for the input...

Glad you appreciated my comment.  I'm blunt, I hunt with a longbow and I kill stuff with however I aim or whatever one would call it.

In the end we all love the mystical flight of the arrow!
Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


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Kelly
Tom M wrote:
First time I saw this was a chapter in the “Master of the Barebow” video. Can’t recall the archers name, he used some kind of grey finish. I use about an 1 1/2” piece of aluminum shaft for footing my carbons. I removed the finish with a file when I am smoothing out the edges. Yes, it comes into my sight picture when I am lining up on the target.


That would have been my good friend Roger Rothhaar. He was painting the front portion(beyond feathers to tip) for several decades before divulging that in the video, but had told many about the reasons for it to whomever asked or saw his arrows.


Yes, it was for aiming and works all the time no matter light conditions or shooting methods.
Yours for better bowhunting, Kelly

http://www.arrowskp.com

>>>>============> Enjoy the flight of an arrow amongst Mother Nature's Glory! Once one opens the mind to the plausible, the unbelievable becomes possible! >>>>============>
Charter Member Traditional Archery Society
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Draven

If I would shoot in low light I would paint at least 1” behind the tip in white. The Push - 1st video I think - is talking about white tape wrap behind the fieldpoint / broadhead. 

 

"Practice not until you get it right, practice until you can't get it wrong." - Unknown
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ShutterbugBowhunter
Great info guys.  Y'all are awesome!!!
Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


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James Calamaris
A good friend of mine used to paint the ferrule of his broadheads with a white luminescent paint. He also used it on his arrow shafts. He was a very good gap shooter and he said it allowed him to see his arrow.
Jim Calamaris 
Portage,IN.

Club Member Traditional Archery Society

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ottertails
IMG_20200817_235143.jpg I used to put a "crest" behind the heads but did it so it could hopefully help me recover the head if it broke off ...which happened quite frequently shooting cedars. And it also dressed up those fancy arrows I used to make...or I thought. 🙂  Not for aiming, though I can see that working for those who shoot that way.  I got some good ribbing from some guys who said I put the crest on the wrong end of the arrow. 😉)

These are some old arrows pictured, most from a couple decades ago. Haven't crested the *wrong end" in a long time.
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fdp
I've seen arrows that belonged to John Schulz that had a white "sock" (basically a crown on the point end) behind the point. I'd say it was to make seeing where the arrow is pointed easier.
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ShutterbugBowhunter
Great info and neat to see the rhymes and reasons...whether actual or theoretical;-).
Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


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ShutterbugBowhunter
This is what I did  Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200818_131310.jpg, Views: 14, Size: 139.08 KB
Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


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Draven
That will do
"Practice not until you get it right, practice until you can't get it wrong." - Unknown
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ShutterbugBowhunter
I shot with two of the arrows having white painted fronts/collars.  I noticed an easier time of aligning the arrow from front to back in the dusky time after sunset.  All in all a help.
Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


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ShutterbugBowhunter
I did more shooting in low light on my deer target last night and had the same results as the previous entry.  Now I may paint the rest of the collars white as well.  I am actually tempted to even put glow in the dark paint as well.  That however starts to seem a little high-tech to me.  I take the approach if it is so dark that I cannot "really" see then I maybe shouldn't shoot.  One of the places I hunt is in a pine forest and it gets dark a bit sooner than an oak forest...
Shutterbug Bowhunter "In life it is best to have a pure heart and a true flying arrow" (Shutterbug Bowhunter)
                                    "Trust in this bow and it will not easily miss"
(Narnia)


Quote 0