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stickandstring Show full post »
JR Belk
trad_bowhunter1965 wrote:
The thing that gets to me about it all is 95% is made oversea in China or 3rd world countries where they pay almost nothing for labor must be the import tax that drives the price.   


Probably not the tax that drives the price so high. I would imagine the high price is a mixture of marketing gimmick and greed. That's why they're made overseas. Merino wool I really don't mind paying for. It's expensive material.
Northern Mist Ramer
Northern Mist Classic
Northern Mist Whisper
Northern Mist Superior
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Steve Graf
I spent almost 6 months in the woods hiking the Appalachian Trail this year.  I wore wool from top to bottom, including my skivvies.  As you might recall, the winter and spring of 2019 were incredibly wet.  And as you might guess, a long walker carries nothing extra on his or her back.  2 pair of darn tough socks, 1 pair of first light pants, 2 pair of undies (a man has to have some self respect), a t-shirt, and a set of thermal undies made up the clothing.  It was expensive and it was worn every day rain or shine.  And all these things are still in almost perfect condition with no visible signs of wear, and no odor.

The folks that I know that went the synthetic route ended up tossing it all out at the end of the hike for the stink that could not be washed out.

As has been observed in this thread, the weakness of wool is wind.  So as long as you wear a wind break of some sort, you are good to go.  I think part of the reason people quit the trail before finishing is just how miserable they feel in their cloths.  I am sure that part of what helped me and my son finish our hike is that no matter the weather, our cloths felt good.
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CTDolan
Way beyond what I can afford! I make due just fine without, though, Minnesota winters and all.
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stickandstring
Steve,
I agree with you, wool is the way to go.
My dad wore wool all his life, summer and winter. As a young guy he suffered with quinsy. A Doctor told him never take it off.

Let it Fly ->>---->
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chuckc
They make golf wind shirts (and pants). Relatively cheap, very light weight, pretty quiet. Who cares the color. Wear it under your outer layer. Still have mine from the 70s when i couldn't afford real nice stuff. Heck, i cut sleeves off Goodwill sweaters so that i could wear more than one and not bulk up my sleeves.

I'm thinking...spend what you can on good merino long underwear. That's the most important. If you still got money available, there is a lot of gear around that could make it disappear. If not, think outside the nine dots and set yourself up.
ChuckC

Charter Member Traditional Archery Society

I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
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NewbieGeno85
I got an old Cabelas Wooltimate pullover and bibs from a thrift store for $20.00!!!! That and Mr. Beam keep me warm. Lol. And I don’t hunt in the rain.
Big G
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stickandstring
I agree, whatever keeps you warm!
Have a buddy from MT who comes every November, breaks in, drinks my bourbon, and borrows my wife’s down parker. I come home, find him asleep in the recliner.
No joke true, nick

Let it Fly ->>---->
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Ben Maher
I don’t think you necessarily needs the patterns , but the materials are game changing if you are worried about weight or flying for extended back country hunts .

Agreed , it is crazy expensive . But for me , flying to hunt or doing 5-7 backpack hunts in Alpine country where it can be hot or snowing , the new materials are well worth their weight 🤓🤓🤓

I have killed many animals wearing red and white t shirts , plaid shirts etc etc

But if I am getting in a plane where baggage is extra , or hunting that back country for a week , I’ll shop the Sitka sales and First Lite as well . Nothing to do with the camo patterns , but the materials and design are great
Charter Member Traditional Archery Society
Purveyor of fine outdoor cutlery and semi professional Longbow toting Roving rogue & lifelong arch enemy of the Nottingham Sheriff .....  
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trad_bowhunter1965
JR Belk wrote:


Probably not the tax that drives the price so high. I would imagine the high price is a mixture of marketing gimmick and greed. That's why they're made overseas. Merino wool I really don't mind paying for. It's expensive material.
I own two Metino wool top Both from Black Ovis and it was half of what you would pay for the rest. What’s funny is as soon as the 2020 gear comes out everyone is trying to sell their 2019 stuff and ten minutes later they are posting how great the 2020 stuff is crazy times we live in.
Yellowstone Half Breed Longbow
Mohawk Sparrow Hawk Longbow
Selway Quivers Yost tabs
SureWood Arrows Grizzly Broadheads
Compton Traditional Bowhunters
Idaho Traditional Bowhunter
Traditional Archers of Oregon
Traditional Archers of Nevada
Professional Bowhunters Society Member
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Old3Toe
Steve Graf wrote:
I spent almost 6 months in the woods hiking the Appalachian Trail this year.  I wore wool from top to bottom, including my skivvies.  As you might recall, the winter and spring of 2019 were incredibly wet.  And as you might guess, a long walker carries nothing extra on his or her back.  2 pair of darn tough socks, 1 pair of first light pants, 2 pair of undies (a man has to have some self respect), a t-shirt, and a set of thermal undies made up the clothing.  It was expensive and it was worn every day rain or shine.  And all these things are still in almost perfect condition with no visible signs of wear, and no odor.

The folks that I know that went the synthetic route ended up tossing it all out at the end of the hike for the stink that could not be washed out.

As has been observed in this thread, the weakness of wool is wind.  So as long as you wear a wind break of some sort, you are good to go.  I think part of the reason people quit the trail before finishing is just how miserable they feel in their cloths.  I am sure that part of what helped me and my son finish our hike is that no matter the weather, our cloths felt good.



This describes my hunting clothing for 99% of the hunting I do in 99% of the seasons I hunt. The marginal difference is a puffy down layer for the bitter cold or gortex shell pants if it’s gonna be really wet.

The formula is simple: wool base layers (socks, undies, longies top and bottom, beanie) wool shirt and pants, vest, and gortex jacket shell. Gloves as needed. I use a heavier set of wool pants later in the season. Just layer up/down as the day dictates. Easy-peasy and always comfy.

“Take the good where you find it, be honest with yourself, and let the results be your guide.”

Hebrews 11:1

Jet Wolverine 69@28, Kramer Autumn 62@27, Jet Leopard 63@28, Howard Hill Wesley Special 57@27, Jet Warthog 69@28. Two Tracks Echo 60@27.

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mistercmath
With my construction-worker's income, Theresa Asbell and military fleece under-layers have kept me in the woods in zero-degrees cold with wind. I really like wool. I use one base layer of merino wool that I got at the big-box sporting goods store for $65. Over that I put up to two layers of military fleece, depending on the need. Then, If I'm in a tree, I will use my Asbell Pathfinder. On the ground still hunting, I use a light-weight camo shirt and pants. This get-up gives me plenty of mobility and it doesn't make me sweat when I walk into the woods or still hunt. The sweating part is my most likely challenge.
The layers make the arrangement flexible so that I can use less when it's warmer. Last year I was in the woods with bow and murderous intent and dressed this way while the temperature was just below zero. I was pretty comfortable for about four hours. 
This year I sewed up a set of white, fleece over-garments that are intended for snow camo. It consists of a hat, face mask, shirt, and pants. Only used it once, but it was warm and I looked like a ghost from a Disney production. The temperature that day was about 20. I'll post pics if I kill a deer while I'm in it. The thing cost me about $24 to make. 
Just the solution from a poor working man.

Currently shooting:
Black Ram Traditions Recurve, 46# @ 30",
Bodnik Slick Stick, 48# @ 30" 

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James Donahue
mistercmath- I'm like you  no way  would I consider  spending that kinda $'s on  clothes
                    too many other cheaper things that would do the same purpose   -   with my wifes health issues and crippled ness would be foolish- too many medical bills 
Colonial Beach, Virginia
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Old3Toe
Wool Tip: This may be common knowledge but.... Very affordable prices on merino base layers can often be had at Sierra Trading Post if you shop the deals. Beyond that thrift stores can hold some real finds on high quality wool. Also, wool can be died easily with unsweetened Kool-Aide. About 3-5 packets per gallon, soak and rinse. Very permanent. If you’re gonna splurge on retail wool, splurge on wool socks.

“Take the good where you find it, be honest with yourself, and let the results be your guide.”

Hebrews 11:1

Jet Wolverine 69@28, Kramer Autumn 62@27, Jet Leopard 63@28, Howard Hill Wesley Special 57@27, Jet Warthog 69@28. Two Tracks Echo 60@27.

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