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Sparkitoff

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've been shooting a 41# selfbow and a 45# mild R/D longbow for around 6 months. Started the first few months prior with a 28# bow. I feel like I am physically capable and accurate now with all. I want to be very efficient for hunting purposes, so I thought I should look for a 50# pound. Then I thought, "maybe 5# (more than I have now) just doesn't mean much". So, assuming similar or better bow efficiency, how much weight jump makes a ballistic difference?  I'm not really trying to extend range.  Flattening trajectory and/or more penetration would be good.  Any thoughts...?
James Donahue

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Reply with quote  #2 
Think was said above 60#'s  reach the point of deminishing returns (see little  increase per pound)
50# very potent 

45#'s I think was about what most used prior  heavy poundage craze  in the early 80's

today hard to sell a bow above 50#'s


 just food for thought-
alot depends on your body  type 47-50# is all I want  -had a brother that shot 80's easier than I could 40#'s

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Colonial Beach, Virginia
James Donahue

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Reply with quote  #3 
PS; go by feel to you not a #
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timking

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Reply with quote  #4 
You won’t have any problem moving up, 50 is a very lethal weight
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Dallas, Texas
62" #55 Fox High Sierra 
62" #58 Black Widow MA
64" #56 A&H ACS 
Widowmaker 350 Carbon shafts
200 gr. Iron Will 4 blade



Selden Slider

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Reply with quote  #5 
You probably can handle 50#, more is unnecessary.  Bows between 45 and 50# are deadly.  As long as your aim is.  Frank
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Sam

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Reply with quote  #6 
I have hunting bows ranging from 50# to 78#. The upper end of this range is difficult to train for and to master. My recommendation for a healthy guy who wants to move up is to go for something in the 50# to 55# range. These weights are attainable and are effective for most anything you are likely to hunt. I know a lot of people will say that it is not necessary to shoot heavier bows, and I agree with that. Yet, you did specifically state you DO wish to increase your draw weight. I was introduced to the longbow by Dan Quillian, who advocated shooting the heaviest bow you can master. I tend to agree with him, at least to a point. If I could still handle that 78# bow, I would still be shooting it, but at age 70, I have had to back off. Currently, my bows are 53# at 28", but I'm actually in the 40's due to a shorter draw length. If you go for it, be careful and have fun.
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Sam McMichael

Gray, GA

"The spirit of the bow dwells in the heart of all young men" - Geronimo

Hill Wesley Special (2, both 65#)
Hill Cheetah (2, one 55# and one 40#)
Hill Big 5 (50#)
NM Shelton (2, both 53#)
Deathwish Longbow (59#)
Archery Traditions Bamboo Longhunter (3, one 56#, one 60# and one 78#)

Tom M

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Reply with quote  #7 

I always liked shooting heavier weight bows. It was one of my goals. I went so far as learning about what muscles needed conditioning, buying a gym membership and working out 4 times a week. For a good number of years I shot 70#-80# bows with ease. That may seem extreme but I feel it’s a good reason I didn’t have the shoulder issues I read so much about on archery websites. No, at age 75 I don’t enjoy my 60# bow but I still can handle my 55# bow well. 

 My question to you, what is your goal? Like has been said, 50#-55# will kill most everything around here. Personally I would get myself proficient at 50#-55# before moving up anymore. When I say proficient I mean at ranges past say 20 yards. Try a field round, 4 arrows at 28 targets with a max range say of 50 yards. 


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Sun City, Az. by way of San Diego, Ca. Bear TD's Wes Wallace Royal LB, ILF risers and various limbs, Vintage Works 1962 Kodiak reproduction made to my specs

I hunt public land.
Draven

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Reply with quote  #8 

Don’t jump #10 from your #45. A #5 to #50 is enough. Feeling capable is different than being as accurate. I know a score is not welcome as test but if you have a 3D course around, keep the score with #45 and compare it with a round done with #50.

PS Flattening a trajectory makes sense just if you shoot past 20-25 yards. 


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fdp

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Reply with quote  #9 
There's more to bow and arrow lethality than draw weight for draw weight's sake.

Like Draven said, the ability to handle the weight, is considerably different than being able to shoot the weight with precision.

The "ballistic" difference is based on bow performance/efficiency.

Glen Cardinale killed his Grizzly with a 45lb. bow. When someone asked him why he used a 45lb. bow he said " Because I knew I could stand 30 yards from the bear and shoot it right in the eye."
CTDolan

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Reply with quote  #10 
I shot a 70# longbow until I blew out my shoulder (the afternoon before a 160-class whitetail had to be passed up, due to my inability to shoot beyond 10 yards with a blown out shoulder). Now I shoot a 50# longbow. It's all I need for big northern whitetails.
Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #11 

I no longer remember how, when, or where I adopted the belief that a 55# traditional bow was completely sufficient to harvest any game animal in North America.  I have had this attitude for a long time.  This probably arose from subtle subconscious indoctrination from all the archery magazine articles, archery books, and archery videos to which I have been exposed over the years.  As a result, for a long time I have considered any traditional bow with a draw weight less than 55# to be a light bow in the sense that it was below the optimum draw weight.  Conversely I have considered any traditional bow with a draw weight greater than 55# to be a superfluously heavy bow for any North American game with the possible exceptions of moose or buffalo (which I do not hunt).   I now realize that I have never really had any rational basis to validate my views described above.

 

Currently I most often shoot my 45# HHA Legend Stick, particularly when frequently shooting for any extended period of time such as during stump shooting or target practice.  When I expect to shoot less often as when hunting, I sometimes use one of my 50# bows, but I most often use my 45# HHA Legend Stick for hunting.  I still harbor and cannot seem to shake a constant secret desire to build up my strength and stamina back up such that I could again routinely shoot a 55# traditional bow at my draw length.


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Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Donahue
Think was said above 60#'s  reach the point of deminishing returns (see little  increase per pound)
50# very potent 

45#'s I think was about what most used prior  heavy poundage craze  in the early 80's

today hard to sell a bow above 50#'s


 just food for thought-
alot depends on your body  type 47-50# is all I want  -had a brother that shot 80's easier than I could 40#'s


I found your comment about a heavy poundage craze in the early 80’s to be surprising and very interesting!  I do not at all dispute your information.  I do not have even the slightest inclination to doubt that there was indeed a heavy poundage craze in the early 80’s.  I just managed to have been oblivious to that craze, which is not really all that surprising.  I would like to know more about this heavy poundage craze.

 

I do have personal experience that at least one person in my small farm town was shooting a very heavy draw weight bow prior to the early 80’s.  In 1970 I was either still shooting my 30# Ben Pearson longbow or I had just recently started shooting my 45# Ben Pearson recurve.  On a hot summer day I stopped my car to talk with a man shooting a longbow in his back yard.  I remember that he was not wearing a shirt, was tall and skinny, was profusely sweating, and seemed to have huge raised veins all over his arms.  He was having a great time shooting his 90# draw weight longbow which he claimed that he shot on a regular basis.


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Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

Old3Toe

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Reply with quote  #13 

The math says that going from 45# to 55# is a 22% increase. Going up 10lbs from 75 is only a 9% increase. That is to say it’s either not much or it’s a lot, depending on where you’re at. 

As for “mastering” a bow, the benchmark I’ve used for decades is simply, “what weight am I fully effective and capable with, stone cold?” Because many times the window of opportunity is open when I’m not warmed up, frozen solid, barely awake, or physically spent. Every time I’ve been that way with a too heavy bow in hand, I’ve regretted it.

And to that end, I’ve settled for myself that this means hunting at 60lbs or less.... and that means practicing cold as well.  No more than two shots morning, noon night this time of year. 

Find that same weight that you can fully master for yourself.  And that will change over the years— which is okay because practice, form, tuning, and judicious choices are what makes a trad bow deadly. 

best of luck!


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“Take the good where you find it, be honest with yourself, and let the results be your guide.”

Hebrews 11:1

Jet Wolverine 69@28, Kramer Autumn 62@27, Jet Leopard 63@28, Howard Hill Wesley Special 57@27, Jet Warthog 69@28. Two Tracks Echo 60@27.

ziplomacy

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Reply with quote  #14 
If you want to go up in draw weight then go for it! If you want to improve penetration you might want to check out the Ashby Bowhunting Foundation.

Here is what they have to say about draw weight in relation to arrow lethality. This is at the end of a list of 12 factors that determine arrow performance upon impact with an animal. It isn't even number twelve it's just an aside. (The link for the pdf looks sketchy but it's not)

" Arrow force derived from the bow comes at the end. Any bow, be it compound, recurve, or longbow, is capable of imparting only a set amount of energy to an arrow of a given mass, producing only a finite amount of arrow force. Modest arrow-force gain can be obtained through the use of higher-mass arrows, increasing bow efficiency. Any substantial gain in arrow force from your bow requires either obtaining a more efficient bow or increasing your bow’s draw weight. The penetration-gain obtainable by increasing your bow’s draw-weight pales in comparison to that achieved through better arrow design. (See 2007 update, Part 3 through 5 and 2008 Update, Parts 3 through 6). Increasing draw weight offers potential for better terminal arrow performance, but that potential is all too easily squandered by a poor-performing arrow. Enhancing arrow performance reaps far richer rewards than does increasing draw weight. Increasing draw weight while ignoring your arrow's design features offers only a very modest gain in terminal performance." - https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5d0443b188b6c900011e0ccc/t/5e9378b48f4a085e431232d4/1586722996915/2019+Terminal+Arrow+Performance+Update.pdf 

Here is the link to the homepage: https://www.ashbybowhunting.org/ashby-reports

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Osage Selfbow #55@28"
NM Baraga #50@28"
Pronghorn Takedown #42@28"
Ben Pearson Cougar #37@28"

Knoxville, TN
Sam

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Reply with quote  #15 
Assuming that a person is healthy and at least of normal strength, shooting  55# is not that big of a deal IF you take your time. Build up by shooting just a few arrows at a time, increasing a few arrows at a time. When I got back into archery after not shooting for several years, I started with a 58# Bamboo Longhunter from Dan Quillian, a vocal advocate of heavier bows. It took about a month or so of regular shooting before I could properly control it, though. So my advice is that if you want to go heavier, don't hold back. Do the work carefully and the results will follow - it ain't really all that hard..
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Sam McMichael

Gray, GA

"The spirit of the bow dwells in the heart of all young men" - Geronimo

Hill Wesley Special (2, both 65#)
Hill Cheetah (2, one 55# and one 40#)
Hill Big 5 (50#)
NM Shelton (2, both 53#)
Deathwish Longbow (59#)
Archery Traditions Bamboo Longhunter (3, one 56#, one 60# and one 78#)

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