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Ugly Coyote

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Reply with quote  #1 
The first ad is from Ye Sylvan Archer, April 1937 and the second, February 1940.

I'm always amazed at what inventive archers come up with.

Funny thing is, I haven't seen any more ads for these, so far, and no articles about their usefulness.

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Deno

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Reply with quote  #2 
I'm guessing DIY string makers didn't want to "send away" for something they couldn't make themselves in their home workshop and stayed with their own strings.

Another guess: Whatever success Hoyt and E&G had, once WWll came about that pretty much used most rubber and latex manufacturers for the war effort.  


Deno

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Clydebow

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Reply with quote  #3 
All the rubber went to the war effort?
Deno

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Reply with quote  #4 
"All the rubber went to the war effort?"


Clyde

You need to look up truck/jeep tires , half track tires, aircraft tires and laytex surgical equipment that was needed after 1941.  Kids collected tin cans and women donated their stockings and girdles.....If these 2 companies, especially Earl Hoyt's. were in business after 1940 as the one ad states, their resources may have dried up.

The first words  I wrote were "Just a guess."   

With all due respect,   instead of "Sniping", add something to the conversation other than a sarcastic one liner.

Every post or picture you've posted, I've responded with a "Like" or a compliment. Never a sarcastic one liner.

You did the same thing on one of my posts on the LW.  


Deno

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Selden Slider

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Reply with quote  #5 
Two years ago I bought my great granddaughter a plastic bow and arrows.  She had no interest and into the closet it went.  Last year I got a video of her shooting it and having a ball.  When we visited them I asked to see her shoot.  What I didn't notice in the video was that the limbs weren't bending at all.  I asked to see the bow and saw it had an elastic string.  Anyway she loves it.  I bought her another dozen arrows.  Frank
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aromakr

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Reply with quote  #6 
I would love to have seen one of those rubberized strings. Earl Hoyt Jr. was not some fly by night in archery. He was an innovator in the sport that made many contributions that are still around today. I am sure the war effort as has been suggested is what stopped production and after that there were materials available that were far superior to Linen for bow strings. That was a good one Ira.

Bob 

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Ugly Coyote

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Reply with quote  #7 
Actually, I had forgotten about the rationing programs during WWII. Women turned in their clothing that contained rubber so it could be melted down and reused. Ironically, the resulting rubber was inferior. Women also gave up their nylons so the material could be used for parachutes and cords. They even painted a seam on the back of their legs so it would look like they were wearing nylons. Sometimes their legs were painted to resemble nylon. Everyone, men and women alike were affected by the rationing.

Aluminum steel, brass, copper, etc. was also rationed and scrap metal was collected by people. My mother, a teenager at the time, went around her neighborhood collecting various items.

Manufacturers making arrows, bows and other tackle from aluminum and steel used up what supplies they had and then had to wait until after the war to resume production.

There are many sources on the internet related to rationing during WWII, if you want to learn more.
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