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Hud

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Reply with quote  #1 
I know some are thinking about grinding feathers for arrows, so a word to wise, from "Stringstretcher" wear a face mask, respirator in a well ventilated area.  I would add, do it outside so the dust does stay inside with you. It might be a good idea to wear disposable gloves and eye goggles and suitable clothes and hat.  You can read the attached forum and his comments. This probably applies to any feathers, or antlers.

http://www.primitivearcher.com/smf/index.php?topic=40262.0
Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #2 

In general the body tries to protect itself from invading foreign objects.  Among the body’s defense methods are (simplistically described) expulsion, digestion, and isolation.

Examples of expulsion are the body’s escalator-like mucus ciliary lined passages in the lungs plus the coughing reflex that move particles upwards into the mouth to be swallowed for ejection through the digestive tract.

The body has scavenger immune cells, organ lining cells, and some organ cells that will consume plus digest foreign particles.

When the body cannot eliminate a foreign particle by ejection or dissolving it; then the body attempts to protect itself by isolating (i.e., sequestering and walling off) the difficult particle at its location inside the body.  The body does not give up, but relentlessly continues to repeatedly attack the isolated particle.  These chronic irritation situations can lead to long term consequences.  The “walling off” isolation takes up space that reduces the capacity of the organ.  The body’s constant attacks release substances that damages local cells.  This constant damage and repair can eventually lead to scarring, tumors, or cancer.

One does not want to breath anything of a certain size that is small enough to get very deep into the lungs while at the same time being too large to be readily ejected.  However, one is still okay should these wrong sized particles still be digestible by the body.  When one is exposed to any foreign particles that are the “bad" size plus they also cannot be digested, then one WANTS TO WEAR (or should want to wear) a mask that prevents things smaller than 0.3 microns from getting deep into their lungs.

Some common examples known to cause these kinds of long term medical problems are cellulose (wood dust), silica (rock dust), asbestos, glass dust, carbon dust, metal dust, etc.

Simply wearing a cheap easily obtainable mask (even when it does not fit perfectly or doesn’t filter ideally) is a tremendous benefit to one’s long term health.  If the mask is not so clogged that one cannot breath through it, then it is still doing good.  Even a bandana over the nose and mouth is significantly beneficial.  YES, wear a mask!


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Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

Jack Skinner

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Reply with quote  #3 
STILL ALIVE! And I have done about everything wrong at one time or the other. In archery and life.

You really should protect yourself as best you can.....or not.

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Jack Skinner

Self Bows, OE's; Heritage, Vixen, Misty Dawn, Heritage II x 2 "The Twins", North Star x 2 Crown Jewel and Cousin It, 7 Lakes SF Carolina Night, Miller Sage, Ramer, Schulz Grandpa, Sunset Hill, Shelton

Cheyenne WY
Hud

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Reply with quote  #4 
“if I’d known, I was going to live this long I would have taken better care of myself” Mickev Mantle. That makes three of us. There might be more. It is the only thing I have in common with the great Mickey M.
Steve Graf

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Reply with quote  #5 
So I've heard this before and tried to be careful with my grinding setup.  I have a vacuum hose right next to the drum sander and that seems to work well for me.

A little googling will bring up something called "pillow lung" and another called "bird breeder lung" and others as well.  Seems just sleeping with a feather pillow can cause the problem for them that are sensitive to it.


chuckc

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Reply with quote  #6 
At least one study has shown that our own saliva can kill us, if taken in small doses over extended periods of time.
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ChuckC

Charter Member Traditional Archery Society

I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckc
At least one study has shown that our own saliva can kill us, if taken in small doses over extended periods of time.

Of course!  Saliva contains water.  Water is a deadly substance.  Just investigate all the human deaths that have been associated with water somehow!

Everything needs to be balanced with practicality and common sense.  I once attended a lecture by Dr. Ames who developed the incredibly sensitive “Ames Test” for determining even the slightest mutagenic activity of a chemical in bacteria.  He developed the test as a scientific tool rather than as a method to regulate or ban possible carcinogens.  During his lecture he railed bitterly about how he was appalled by the regulatory misuse of his research tool to ban all sorts of useful chemicals that had been demonstrated to have carcinogenic activity only at minute unrealistic concentrations.  The dose makes the poison!  As Dr. Ames pointed out, even the deadliest poison or carcinogen cannot harm anyone at only a few parts per billion.  So demonstrating carcinogenic activity at a few parts per billion of anything is meaningless.  Yet those who want to regulate us to death have banned many good useful things on this basis.

This might explain why I am the way I am – LOL.  In grade school I had obtained a baby food jar filled with pure metal mercury.  It became a favorite toy.  We had no air-conditioning until I was an adult.  During the oppressively hot dog days of summer, I would entertain myself for hours by rolling the heavy ball of mercury around on my hot bedroom floor (worst possible exposure).  Later in life one of the technicians in my lab accidently dropped a mercury thermometer on the floor resulting in a very tiny ball of mercury on the laboratory floor.  My technicians dutifully reported the “hazard” as they had been trained.  In an absolutely ridiculous response, the University sealed off my lab plus sent a young girl wearing a completely self-contained hazmat suit with oxygen tanks.  Her job while wearing huge protective gloves was to maneuver this tiny ball of mercury into a glass test tube and then to seal it with a cork.  This was an almost impossible task in her clumsy protection.  I had very valuable months of research that was going to be ruined by this long delay for ridiculous reasons.  I became angry.  I tore down the warning tape across the lab door, took the test tube from the girl, pushed her out of the way, and use my bare hands to put the mercury into the test tube.  I knew from firsthand practical experience in my past that this tiny amount of exposure to mercury could never harm me.  Of course, I got in a lot of trouble for my “dangerous” behavior.

Like others in this thread, I have actually done everything wrong.  I have been overexposed to unusually dangerous chemicals, many different types of radiation, and other hazards that many would not normally encounter.  Yet, I am over 66 years old with no medical problems.  The regulators have people unreasonably frightened of their shadows over many relatively harmless potential hazards.  I do believe that it is very reasonable to protect yourself when it is easy and practical.  If I am going to be creating wood dust, carbon arrow shaft dust, or flint dust from knapping; then I am going to wear a mask.  This is particularly true when it is voluntarily my choice.  No free man should be forced to protect himself by a government agency!


__________________
Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

Hud

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Reply with quote  #8 
I remember StringStretcher's original posts in 2013, when he said, he had to quit grinding for customers.  I figured there had to be a better system, such as cutting with a utility knife and double feather clamp in a vise. Even considered modifying a paper cutter.  It would be necessary set the quill in at an angle for a even cut. Any sanding would be done outside with a respirator.  I did not want the dust inside. If anyone has any suggestions, I would like to hear about them. 
chuckc

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Reply with quote  #9 
There are any number of containment boxes with attached or nearby air collection or movement systems available. From purchasing a biosafety cabinet to simply making a box around your grinder with open ends for arms / hands, a plexiglass front for visibility, and a fan pushing air in one side and out the other. Do this outside and blow the dust in your neighbor's yard.

BTW...agree 100% with Fallhunt.

In my past life I did a number of different chores for a certain agency, one of which was to represent the agency to the public.

On more than one occasion i met with members of older folks homes or groups and discussed topics they wanted to hear about..often about what is healthy, are vitamins good for you, and similar topics. I spoke about research and studies but cautioned them to always use their own thoughts and ask questions.

I often posted a cartoon of a person..obviously a researcher, in lab garb etc., along the back wall of his room were cages of rats and on the table in front were several rat traps, with dead rats, as expected.

He, with phone to ear, said something to the tune of "FDA...i want to report research that directly links cheese with death in rats."

Learn, listen, then use your own brain to decide.

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ChuckC

Charter Member Traditional Archery Society

I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Tom M

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Reply with quote  #10 
i am no expert on the subject but since I have moved to AZ. I have become sensitive to dust, dirt dust, wood dust, etc. so I pay attention more to what I expose myself to. Heck, I used to work around all kinds of solvents in the lithograph shop. No gloves, masks, or goggles. I still have on my workbench bottles filled with Aceton, Fletch Laq thinner, DNA, and mineral spirits. I have learned to do my sanding outside or at the appropriate workstation at our woodworking club. I am 74++ looking forward to a valve job in 3-5 years. 
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Charter Member Traditional Archery Society

Sun City, Az. by way of San Diego, Ca. Bear TD's Wes Wallace Royal LB, ILF risers and various limbs, Vintage Works 1962 Kodiak reproduction made to my specs

I hunt public land.
WhistlingBadger

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hm, I don't grind feathers.  Just peel them off the shaft, touch them up a bit with a file and a fine pair of scissors if necessary (it usually isn't), and glue 'em on.  Looks like I'm gonna live forever.
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Wind River Country, Wyoming
Fall down six times.  Stand up seven.
http://www.whistlingbadger.com
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