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Tradslinger

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Reply with quote  #1 
A lot of people struggle with the gamey taste that venison can have. We eat a lot of venison but we have family that gripe normally. So I began taking the venison that we plan to eat and soak it in cold water in the fridge for about 5 days total. I change the water daily to get rid of the bloody water and this gets most of the taste out. however, I smoked some Tri Tips a while back and they can have quite a bit of fat on them like a brisket does. Normally We trim most of it off but I decided to leave it on. I smoked the Tri Tip for about 4 hours and then put it in a big slow cooker and let it cook for about 6 hours. The meat was falling apart and very smoky flavored. By cooking like this in the slow cooker, a lot of the fat had melted off and left a very smokey broth with the melted fat. So basically what I did with this broth and fat that I saved plus any remaining fat that was on the tri tip was to slow cook a deer ham in this beefy fatty broth. When the 8 hours in the slow cooker were up, the venison tasted exactly like beef, like brisket or a really good beef roast. Didn't bother to tell anyone that it was venison and man did it disappear. My father had sandwiches from it that night and then for breakfast. Then he showed back up to see if there was any more of it left. I used the same beef broth for 3 hams total so I got my moneys worth out of it. Suddenly I have people excited about eating venison that weren't so before. Guess we will have to harvest more deer next year....no problem with me!
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Steve Graf

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Reply with quote  #2 
My kids were raised on venison.  They didn't taste beef till they were nearly teenagers and never developed a taste for it.  I prefer the taste of game over beef too.

To me, beef is a flabby tasteless meat.  I know it's what most of us (including me) grew up on, and so we naturally compare everything else to it.  But if you eat enough venison, you will develop a taste for it that doesn't require a lot of effort to change its nature.  And then when you eat beef, you will ask yourself: "what is the big deal with this?"

That said, I dry-age all the deer (and our farm raised sheep) I kill for 2 weeks.  There is nothing like hanging a deer, sheep, (or cow) for two weeks in a meat cooler to improve its taste and its nutrition.   And to be fair to the venison, the comparison to beef should be done with beef just killed and not aged like most people eat venison.  Fresh beef actually tastes pretty bad.

Here's a starter article on wet and dry aging : https://jesspryles.com/dry-aging/  For them that are interested there is a lot on the internet about how to age meat and what the health and flavor benefits are.

Tradslinger, you have just peeked through the door of what is possible.  Exploring how to process your own game is an adventure almost as fun as the challenge of hunting it.  And I would encourage you to think of venison as its own, most glorious meat, without need for comparison to beef.

And here's a couple pictures of my meat cooler, built under the back steps and Cooler2.jpg  cooler3.jpg  to hold 2 carcasses.



Selden Slider

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Reply with quote  #3 
I enjoy venison as much as the next guy although I don't come by it too often.  However a well aged beef rib steak can't be beat.  Perhaps not as good as beef that used to be corn fed but still very tasty.  Frank 
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Tradslinger

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Reply with quote  #4 
Been processing my own wild meat from deer to wild hogs and even bear for over 45 years, not including small game and birds. I can usually tell the difference between a deer or animal that was a bow kill versus a gun kill by how bloody the meat is when preparing. I have to admit that the only time that I do any sort of dry aging is in the colder days of fall/winter when I simply let the animal hang outside. My grandfather told me of the days of no refrigeration that they would hang a deer carcass up high in a big tree. That the cold wind would turn the outside of the meat black but they would simply lower the carcass down and cut off what they needed to eat that day. He said that they would do this for about a month. We harvested 6 deer this past season for the wife and I to eat mainly. 3 were younger deer for tenderness. I have been eating venison for over 50 years and count on it as a main food source. but, we do have those that don't fancy to the wild game flavor. And I can get tired of it as well but I am easily burning out on just about anything. 
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Huntschool

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Reply with quote  #5 
Steve Graf hit the nail....  Hang that deer.  We gut, skin, split and hang neck down for at least a week if not two.  I want all that blood drained out.  Lividity will do it.

These days so many folks run their deer to a locker or processor and dont let them hang and drain all that blood.  Its a waste of good meat.  

Just my opinion

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old buck

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Reply with quote  #6 
A few years back I made a big batch of venison strogenoff for a church picnic and one guy asked me "How do get the wild taste out?" 
I said go to Winn Dixie. Took him a second but he got the idea.
As Steve said I want my wild game to taste like what it is. That said I've only eaten coot once ( when a teenager ) and won't ever again.
chuckc

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Reply with quote  #7 
If you are not keen on the taste, grind it all into ground "beef" and use it in chili, casseroles, tacos, spaghetti sauce etc. Cut chunks for stir fry, stew etc.
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ChuckC

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I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Mike Reilly

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm with Steve on hanging the deer for awhile. That has been a game changer. Two other points: get all the "white" off the meat and DON'T over cook. This is a bit of back strap we had last Thursday. Pan sear all sides, even the ends and then place in an oven preheated at 450 for 3-5 minutes. This is how the inside should look. Wife and kids devoured it.

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Arrow Hunter

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Reply with quote  #9 
I used to enjoy the natural taste of venison, you know un-aged. Then about 30 years ago I was served up some French dipped sandwiches, thinly sliced meat on a bun you dip in the juice. I complimented the guy with that was the best tasting beef I ever had. He said, that’s venison. He told me you have to let it hang. So if it ain’t cold enough to hang it in the shed, which it hasn’t been for years, I cut it up and place it on racks in the fridge. I lose some meat having to trim it but man does it smell and taste good!
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