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Old3Toe

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Reply with quote  #26 
Eye-yi-yi... heal fast brother.

PS. Thanks for taking one for the team to clearly illustrate why push-pull is a BAD idea on a recurve, and, also a moment to be utterly respected even with a longbow. You made me think twice at least twice today.... seriously, thank you.

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Tom M

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Reply with quote  #27 
So, how are you doing? Any pain? 
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I hunt public land.
johnhenry72

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Reply with quote  #28 
I am sorry for your accident,  A number of years ago I was shooting at a indoor  range,  a guy was going to string up his recurve and was using the step though method when a friend offered him his bow stringer,  Na I'm good,  with that his hand slipped and the curve of the bow came up and took his eye out.  I still can hear the screams and see the blood.  Thank God we had a EMT with us.  He did lose his eye.  I NEVER string my bows with out one..
Clydebow

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Reply with quote  #29 
 It was pretty sore for the first day. More like a light throb after that.
jaz5833

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Reply with quote  #30 
A fellow San Diego Archer nearly lost an eye, push pull stringing, a longbow. Two years later, he's still having depth of field problems.
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Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaz5833
A fellow San Diego Archer nearly lost an eye, push pull stringing, a longbow. Two years later, he's still having depth of field problems.

That is a scary story!  It makes me pause to consider whether I should use a stringer for a longbow.

I always feel completely safe while push-pull bracing a longbow.  But currently all my longbows are less than 50#.  I have the skinny upper limb nestled securely at the same location on my draw hand as the same position that I hold the bow grip in my bow hand.  My hand completely surrounds the upper bow limb.  My hand is always solidly between the bow limb and me.  While holding the upper limb high above the bow grip with my bow hand, I use the web of my draw hand to slide the string nock loop up into the limb nock.  This action bends the limb tip away from me as the string loop snaps solidly into place.

This is effortless, fast, and doesn’t begin to stress my back with my 64” and 66” light draw weight longbows.  Due to the length of my longbows it seems physically impossible that the upper limb tip could ever come anywhere near to making contact with my head.  As the limb tip straightens it would always be higher than my head.  It is hard to envision how, but should a slip somehow cause the upper limb to bypass my hand, then it could conceivably whack my forehead.

I use bottom limb tip protectors on my bows now.  But two hunting seasons ago I pressed the bottom limb tip of my longbow into some soft soil while unbracing my longbow after hunting.  There must have been something sharp slightly beneath the soil that cut my bottom string loop without me noticing.  The next day when I first braced my longbow the string loop broke.  I had just finished bracing my bow as normal.  I had removed my hand that I had used to slide the string loop into the upper limb nock.  My hand was no longer position between me and the bow limb.  However, I was still holding the bow limb with my bow hand.  Suddenly my bow hand was jolted as my bow instantaneously snapped straight.  The bow jumped upwards and slightly away from me.  Faster than I could think, observe, or react; I found myself holding my straight unbraced longbow.  My first thought was that I had neglected to properly check that my bottom string loop had been securely in place thus allowing it to slip out of the limb nock.  Upon examination the bottom string loop appeared to have been cut cleanly with a knife.  This relatively recent firsthand personal experience engenders some confidence that my low draw weight bows combined with my push-pull method is not particularly risky.

If a bow stringer did not aggravate my back so much, then I might consider using a bow stringer for all my bows.  However, it is just so fast, easy, and comfortable to use the push-pull method for my longbows plus I honestly do not feel at risk.


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Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

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Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #32 

I certainly would be very interested to hear other stories that collaborate that slipping while push-pull bracing a longbow has struck others in the eye region rather than the forehead.

By The Way, I do not believe that instances involving recurve ILF rigs that are now considered to be longbows by the new technical definition of longbows (string does not touch limb) should count as slipping events applicable to real longbows.


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Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

skookum

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Reply with quote  #33 
Clyde, you know that leaving your bow strung all the time really doesn't hurt it.  Over the years, I've seen some terrible accidents to both bow and archer during the stringing/unstringing process (only with recurves, not straight-enders). 
Hope that you heal-up OK.

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Tom M

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Reply with quote  #34 
Bow stringers can be a scary experience as well. I use the type with pouches on both ends. Same as Black Widow recommends for their bows. Even that kind makes me turn my head away. I know some bowyers recommend the kind that slips on the upper limb but after my wife almost lost an eye and another friend of ours got a nasty gash from that rubber thingy slipping I threw ours away. 
 I am of the group that leaves my bows strung until I need to do something like change strings. I do keep them hung on pegs Straight up and down. A bow is easier to replace than my eyes.

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Sun City, Az. by way of San Diego, Ca. Bear TD's Wes Wallace Royal LB, ILF risers and various limbs, Vintage Works 1962 Kodiak reproduction made to my specs

I hunt public land.
3bows

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Reply with quote  #35 
You we're lucky in 2002 my wife Jenny was stringing her long bow (push/pull) and didn't get string fully seated in grove, relaxed and bow hit her in the left eye. She was blind in that eye for a couple months, after two long surgerys two month apart she has 20/50 sight in that eye and it is an on going problem watering and blurry. So please your stringers. Take care, Brad
Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaz5833
A fellow San Diego Archer nearly lost an eye, push pull stringing, a longbow. Two years later, he's still having depth of field problems.


Multiple reports on this thread of injuries from push-pull bracing of a longbow tends to lower my confidence that I am completely safe while push-pull bracing my one-piece straight-limbed ASL type of longbows.

Sorry for your friends suffering! Please provide more detailed information about the make, model, and type of longbow that was involved in the injury.  Was the longbow an ASL type of longbow?  Was the longbow a straight-limbed longbow?  Also more details about the circumstances of the injury (i.e., the manner of the push-pull bracing) would be appreciated.  Thanks!


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Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3bows
You we're lucky in 2002 my wife Jenny was stringing her long bow (push/pull) and didn't get string fully seated in grove, relaxed and bow hit her in the left eye. She was blind in that eye for a couple months, after two long surgerys two month apart she has 20/50 sight in that eye and it is an on going problem watering and blurry. So please your stringers. Take care, Brad


Multiple reports on this thread of injuries from push-pull bracing of a longbow tends to lower my confidence that I am completely safe while push-pull bracing my one-piece straight-limbed ASL type of longbows.

Sorry for your wife's suffering! Please provide more detailed information about the make, model, and type of longbow that was involved in the injury.  Was the longbow an ASL type of longbow?  Was the longbow a straight-limbed longbow?  Also more details about the circumstances of the injury (i.e., the manner of the push-pull bracing) would be appreciated.  Thanks!


__________________
Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

tsgro

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Reply with quote  #38 
 
Hope you getting better. That looks like it hurt!
 

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3bows

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Reply with quote  #39 
Hello Fallhunt, Jenny's bow was an 66" ASL Elburg Condor, straight limbed bow with about 1" back set, small nocks, Jen had strung this bow thousands of time with no problem, we always check with are fingers to be sure everything is correct, but things happen and this was a bad thing. Push/pull is a good way to string this type of bow, but make sure string properly seated. Take care, Brad
Old3Toe

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Reply with quote  #40 
Of these longbows, I string the one I the fore ground with fear and trepidation. Look at those itty-bitty nocks!

Which brings me to another thought: No matter how you choose to string your bow— perhaps the biggest risk might be the string loop slipping, or not getting fully set in the grove, and then popping out without warning AFTER you thought it was strung having let off tension or your guard down. Particularly at the bottom loop/nock.

Be safe gents!

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Jet Wolverine 69@28, Kramer Autumn 62@27, Jet Leopard 63@28, Howard Hill Wesley Special 57@27, Jet Warthog 69@28. Two Tracks Echo 60@27.

Fallhunt

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Reply with quote  #41 

From this very informative and cautionary thread, it seems that it might be the case that there are no absolutely guaranteed safe ways to brace a bow regardless of whether one uses step-through, push-pull, or even a stringer.  I suppose that even a bow left continuously strung could have an unpredictable string loop failure at exactly the worst moment.

People have been injured by longbows as well as recurves.  I do believe that there is increased jeopardy from bracing a recurve by the push-pull method (Only by chance, I got away with this routinely in the past).

It might be similar to hazardous shards from arrow failure during release that resulted from previously undetected crack damage associated with wood arrows, fiberglass arrows, or carbon arrows.  Aluminum arrows are probably more similar to a bow kept continuously strung (not impossible, but much less likely).

One must just always try to do due diligence 100% of the time.  One must test arrows by frequent examination, twisting, and bending.  One must carefully brace a bow followed by wary scrutinizing inspection before letting down their guard.  Even after one has done everything possible, sometimes bad things just happen due to random bad luck.


__________________
Southern Illinois
HHA Legend Stick Longbows 45#, 50# & 53#
HHA Tembo Longbows 30#, 40# & 45#
Bear Montana Longbows 30#, 40#, & 50#
Lemonwood Self-Bow Longbow 30#
Ben Pearson Pony Longbow/Semi-Recurve 30# (Purchased New Summer 1966)
Ben Pearson Super Jet Recurve (All Fiberglass) 45# (New Jan. 1970)
Bear Super Kodiak Recurve 55#

PROUDLY an Irredeemable Deplorable

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