photo f2fc6645-3553-483b-b64e-4c19058f6c05_zps121db233.jpg  photo 7B537578-F7C7-4F86-98B8-9F94E0644C33_zpsqirpypxs.jpg  photo jdberry_zpsea01d711.jpg  photo grizzlybroadheads_zps1m2s5rho.jpg  photo banner-kking-160-170_zps48e9d6a9.jpg  photo HolmMadeNewAd_09092014_zpsc4e4691d.jpg  photo truenortharrows_zpsi9ay4gwc.gif  photo 35A0AFC6-0F9E-412C-A64B-EBE54AF0479D_zpsmipyof8e.jpg  photo EEE5CA06-2368-4F2F-A920-0CA562579FE0_zpsm9lvvu1t.jpg  photo northernmist20bcard1_zpssaxw3n46.jpg  photo 072BD871-7553-4294-BBDD-E69370AD1F6A_zpsjismq5n7.jpg                                     photo AFF3B4E3-F518-4092-A4E6-65AE830AB2BE_zpsnuwaaten.jpg  photo f5d37de7-de84-47ad-b248-e8adfe84c5db_zps4oisluth.gif  photo 02c77249-7155-4785-a743-8faf8c694e7a_zpseaj9xlnz.jpg  photo B5D4E580-5A4C-4A25-AC73-D69CDBE82A69_zpsvvtli29v.jpg  photo Dave_shooting_bow_logo202_zpsuskt81vw.jpg  photo image_zps2rrhsrju.jpeg  photo sunsethill_zps551c0207.jpg  photo db77abad-c90f-4ee5-9e34-905fe0c0fd36_zpsleoiybdo.png  photo bigjim_zps76882839.jpg  photo howardhill_large_zps5fd2fcc7.jpg  photo IMG_5966_zpsgrbhwrgb.jpeg  photo Bearpaw_Products_Logo1_zps55d85f33.jpg  photo tradtech_zps697b00c1.jpg  photo a3c08d6f-f669-46b5-8b0c-1480a411cc78_zpsc853b3a6.gif  photo fairbow_zpsc278ec39.jpg  photo F5A4B354-1040-4D43-939F-28ED48F7E5B7_zpsws5ptsc8.jpg  photo coyote track 1_zpshipxn54s.png  photo DF07A98B-41BB-4024-BCF7-A4FCB543D40E_zpsoiduf1m2.png  photo the20footed20shaft_zpsudbyv3ab.jpg  photo blackeaglefinal_zpsfqgqqrcj.png  photo 94936CDE-4CF5-4181-B2F9-FECCA1FE886F_zpsy5nfpirv.jpg photo D49F4739-A11D-4F9D-9D50-4C3EE95E9555_zpswoqwk23o.jpg  photo BF4712C7-9EE6-460F-8380-4E7F08A65416_zpsmluzlgny.jpg  photo bivoucascreenshot_zpscfdgf0n0.jpg  photo 510CA748-680D-4178-8B50-1A4C7F7F895D_zps6b5pjjoc.gif
Traditional Archers | Bowhunters
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 3 of 3      Prev   1   2   3
Orion

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 343
Reply with quote  #51 
How I carry my arrows depends a lot on where and when I hunt.  Day hunts, where I know my way around, I usually use a back quiver and can carry most everything else I need in a small fanny pack or my pockets.  In the mountains out West, packed in, it's a different story.  

I use a Bison Gear "fanny pack" out there.  It's called a fanny pack, but is large enough to carry as much as most rucksacks. The additional clothes, raingear, small, light tarp, game bags, etc., to deal with sudden severe changes in weather, get an elk out of the woods, or stay out over night, which I've done on occasion, just won't fit in a small fanny pack. The contents of my pack are based on experience, some not so pleasant.  Can't just walk back to the truck if it starts to rain, sleet, snow and blow, particularly when it does it for days on end   I've damn near died a few times when I wasn't adequately prepared.I can use a back quiver with the Bison Gear pack, but I find a bow quiver more convenient.  Yep, a Selway looks fine and works well on a Hill. Whatever floats your boat.  [biggrin]
charles lamb

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 377
Reply with quote  #52 
Pat... what a coincidence, I've been working on the laser sight idea in my spare time. Right now I've put it in the end of the stabilizer and that seems the ideal spot. Working on a few other improvements as well.

HH_Stabil_e.jpg 

frassettor

Associate Member
Registered:
Posts: 48
Reply with quote  #53 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nater D
A lumbar pack like the ones Bison Gear makes, or KOM, works very well with a back quiver when you need extra gear. Quite well.


This is what I use. My shoulder quiver works great with my Bison Gear pack!


Attached Images
jpeg 726943E7-32C9-4BD6-96D8-EB91264CDCC1.jpeg (608.08 KB, 46 views)

James Donahue

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,279
Reply with quote  #54 
I use a haversack with my back quiver (have a small one for early season and a larger Bison Gear for late season-when needing more stuff)

also have a larger than needed Bison Gear Lost River fanny pack if extended stay hunts

The little one Three Rivers sells  is about the right size for most things I do

__________________
Colonial Beach, Virginia
Nater D

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 127
Reply with quote  #55 
Here’s the KOM pack. Bought in 1994 and still in service today.

Attached Images
png E535EA6E-E8CA-44B7-B5DB-13FFAFBA26EA.png (951.93 KB, 53 views)

lingbane

Associate Member
Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #56 
Nate, I totally agree with you up to a point if I’m  hunting deer. But hunting elk in the coast range of Oregon or the Wallowas I’m generally miles from my rig and if I need to pack meat out on the first trip back to the truck just makes sense. I generally have my fanny pack strapped to my pack board with a Raptor archery side quiver hanging off my side. But everything I need is in my fanny pack I don’t pack the kitchen sink which I think I’ve seen some guys do. 
Selden Slider

Avatar / Picture

Charter Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,825
Reply with quote  #57 
I can use most anything with a back quiver.  I have a Cabela's fleece and suede day pack that a back quiver fits nicely along side.  Usually however, I use a haversack type bag for day hunts close to home.  Frank  
__________________
Charter Member Traditional Archery Society
chuckc

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,859
Reply with quote  #58 
I use an Asbell haversack for day hunts.  Out west, well, I've tried a lot of combos.  A lot depends on how you want to handle game etc at the moment.
__________________
ChuckC

Charter Member Traditional Archery Society

I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Selden Slider

Avatar / Picture

Charter Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,825
Reply with quote  #59 
Chuck,
I had an Asbell haversack but used it only once.  I didn't like the way everything found its way to the center of the bag and caused it to sag.  I sold it and bought an Army surplus small messenger bag.  Carries enough stuff for a day's sit and everything stays put.  Quiet too.  Recently I checked out the 3Rivers haversack.  The Denier material is way too noisy so I returned it.  Well thought out bag except for the noise.  Frank

__________________
Charter Member Traditional Archery Society
chuckc

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,859
Reply with quote  #60 
I hear ya Frank.  It can do that, but i don't  tend to carry much any more for day trips and i like the pockets.  Have tags and a tiny Bear sharpener  in one side pocket,  extra string and a small surgical kit in another side pocket.  Gloves, a call maybe,  face mask, small square of carpet  to stick my bow tip into. Instead of the marsh mud, all that stuff goes in the main pockets.   Heaviest normal thing is a flash light or a twig snipper.  I rarely carry water for day trips any more.  Again,  out west is another story.
__________________
ChuckC

Charter Member Traditional Archery Society

I did too !

Madison, Wisconsin.   Public land hunter
Orion

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 343
Reply with quote  #61 
I tend to agree, SS.  I use a Bison Gear pack, which is a pretty big pack, though it rides low enough on my back that I think it would be possible to use a back quiver above it.  That being said, I use a bow quiver on my Western hunts.

I do carry a fair amount of stuff on my Western hunts, and I use most of it.  Weather can change rapidly, and I plan to be out all day and sometimes overnight as well.  So, I carry rain gear and a light jacket or vest in the pack, sometimes an extra hat or gloves, water, game bags, cordage, knife, a few first aid items, gorp, pocket camera, etc.  I always have my binos around my neck.  When I kill something, I don't want to walk 3 to 5 miles back to camp (and the same distance back to the critter) to get the equipment to process and hang an elk.  That can take a half day or more in the mountains, and that time lost (not to mention the extra toll it takes on the hunter) can determine if one gets the meat out in good condition. With the pack I have, I can pack out 50# or more meat on the first trip out. 
Old3Toe

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 479
Reply with quote  #62 

CCBB5C2B-9ACF-4284-AF03-07F71200FBE7.jpeg  Duluth All-Day Lumbar Pack

I’ve lost track how long I’ve had this thing, but I rediscovered how much I liked it when I started hunting with a back quiver exclusively. Mostly out west here. But anymore I hardly leave home without it. I’ll see if I can get a pic with it and a back quiver on I’ll post it up, but they seem made for each other almost. 

Two 1-liter water bottles, filter, flashlight, food, cordage, knife, kit, game bags, etc— trekking poles and space enough extra layers strap to the outside as they come off.  

Enough for a long day (and night when need be) plus breaking down/cooling an animal and then taking some out/back to camp where a pack frame is waiting. 

 



__________________

“Take the good where you find it, be honest with yourself, and let the results be your guide.”

Hebrews 11:1

Jet Wolverine 69@28, Kramer Autumn 62@27, Jet Leopard 63@28, Howard Hill Wesley Special 57@27, Jet Warthog 69@28. Two Tracks Echo 60@27.

longcruise

Avatar / Picture

Club Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,633
Reply with quote  #63 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orion
I tend to agree, SS.  I use a Bison Gear pack, which is a pretty big pack, though it rides low enough on my back that I think it would be possible to use a back quiver above it.  That being said, I use a bow quiver on my Western hunts.

I do carry a fair amount of stuff on my Western hunts, and I use most of it.  Weather can change rapidly, and I plan to be out all day and sometimes overnight as well.  So, I carry rain gear and a light jacket or vest in the pack, sometimes an extra hat or gloves, water, game bags, cordage, knife, a few first aid items, gorp, pocket camera, etc.  I always have my binos around my neck.  When I kill something, I don't want to walk 3 to 5 miles back to camp (and the same distance back to the critter) to get the equipment to process and hang an elk.  That can take a half day or more in the mountains, and that time lost (not to mention the extra toll it takes on the hunter) can determine if one gets the meat out in good condition. With the pack I have, I can pack out 50# or more meat on the first trip out. 


My approach exactly. 

__________________
Longcruise
Colorado PUBLIC LAND HUNTER
lingbane

Associate Member
Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #64 
Orion, you expressed it better than I could. I had to unintentionally spend the night out in the woods at least once so a pack of some sort with essentials is important. There were times I killed something way back in the mountains or canyons and would have given half my kingdom for a pack board right then. Pretty much anymore if I’m going to be “out there” I’m bringing a meat pack of some sort. 
Larry Dean Brandes

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 184
Reply with quote  #65 
One fellow here added a couple of belt loops to the high side of his back quiver and ran two extra straps from his pack through the belt loops and around his back quiver. He uses the same system when carrying his Lone Wolf tree stand.  If his arrows are rattling too much, he just tightens the straps a bit.
Old3Toe

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 479
Reply with quote  #66 
Here is my fannypack-backquiver arrangement. This allows for full, regular use of the quiver which I don’t get with a backpack. Basically this is how I bow hunt from the cabin/truck/spike camp.... where the pack frame is. And, thus far I’ve been pleased with it.  2D6C1409-8A72-4AFD-AF74-3F1874792658.jpeg

__________________

“Take the good where you find it, be honest with yourself, and let the results be your guide.”

Hebrews 11:1

Jet Wolverine 69@28, Kramer Autumn 62@27, Jet Leopard 63@28, Howard Hill Wesley Special 57@27, Jet Warthog 69@28. Two Tracks Echo 60@27.

Toxophilite

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 139
Reply with quote  #67 
I’ve got an alder Pack Idaho backpack which I believe became Bison Pack. But when I ordered my pack I also ordered a back quiver that attaches to the pack so you can carry both. Wish they still made them.  Here’s a picture of it attached to my pack. 

32F245E6-21E1-44C6-822A-842FA1F93B18.jpeg 


__________________
Neven M.
Selden Slider

Avatar / Picture

Charter Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,825
Reply with quote  #68 
I think some of you have no idea how to use a back quiver with a day pack.  The quiver doesn't sit on top of the day pack, it rides alongside on your string hand side.  In this position there is no need to "bump up" the quiver.  It stays put.  Adjust the straps on the quiver to get the proper fit.  You can easily access the arrows when needed.  The day pack is put on first, then the quiver.  Of course, practice with it is necessary.  I don't use the day pack anymore.  I liked it to carry a jacket and sweater and the rest of my gear.  Now I live in Florida but haven't hunted here yet.  I do hunt in Texas when visiting my son and it's usually warm.
__________________
Charter Member Traditional Archery Society
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.